The association between parental risk behaviors during childhood and having high risk networks in adulthood

Abby E. Rudolph, Kandice C. Jones, Carl A Latkin, Natalie D. Crawford, Crystal M. Fuller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Prior research suggests that both social networks and parent drug use influence individual drug use among adolescents and that peers continue to influence drug use among adults. This analysis aims to determine whether parent drug use during childhood is associated with having drug-using networks in adulthood after adjusting for individual adult drug use. Methods: 650 young adult drug users were recruited through targeted street outreach and respondent-driven sampling in New York City (2006-2009). Baseline surveys ascertained demographics, network characteristics, drug use behaviors, and parental drug use during childhood. Negative binomial regression was used to evaluate this association. Results: The median age was 33 years, 22% injected, 49% were Black, and during childhood 26% of mothers, 32% of fathers, and 13% of primary caregivers used drugs. After adjustment, having >1 parent who used drugs was associated with having a greater proportion of drug using (Adjusted Prevalence Ratio [APR] = 1.18; 95%CI: 1.01-1.38) and specifically crack-smoking networks (APR = 1.71; 95%CI: 1.21-2.43) in adulthood. Females' networks consisted of more drug users (APR = 1.18; 95%CI: 1.01-1.38), injectors (APR = 1.44; 95%CI: 1.09-1.90), crack smokers (APR = 1.48; 95%CI: 1.18-1.87) and heroin users (APR = 1.43; 95%CI: 1.13-1.81); blacks had a greater proportion of crack smoking (APR = 1.41; 95%CI: 1.09-1.82), but a smaller proportion of injecting (APR = 0.64; 95%CI: 0.43-0.94) and heroin smoking (APR = 0.60; 95%CI: 0.47-0.77) networks as adults. Conclusions: These data suggest that parental drug use is independently associated with having drug-using networks in adulthood. Interventions that target parents and caregivers and that promote drug cessation could impede risky network formation in both adolescents and adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)437-443
Number of pages7
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume118
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2011

Fingerprint

Risk-Taking
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Parents
Smoking
Heroin
Drug Users
Caregivers
Cracks
Social Adjustment
Fathers
Social Support
Young Adult
Mothers
Demography

Keywords

  • Drug use
  • Parent drug use
  • Peer influence
  • Racial disparities
  • Social networks

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

The association between parental risk behaviors during childhood and having high risk networks in adulthood. / Rudolph, Abby E.; Jones, Kandice C.; Latkin, Carl A; Crawford, Natalie D.; Fuller, Crystal M.

In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence, Vol. 118, No. 2-3, 01.11.2011, p. 437-443.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rudolph, Abby E. ; Jones, Kandice C. ; Latkin, Carl A ; Crawford, Natalie D. ; Fuller, Crystal M. / The association between parental risk behaviors during childhood and having high risk networks in adulthood. In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence. 2011 ; Vol. 118, No. 2-3. pp. 437-443.
@article{e9aca0b39f7d4c35a8b2ca3b41e34b33,
title = "The association between parental risk behaviors during childhood and having high risk networks in adulthood",
abstract = "Background: Prior research suggests that both social networks and parent drug use influence individual drug use among adolescents and that peers continue to influence drug use among adults. This analysis aims to determine whether parent drug use during childhood is associated with having drug-using networks in adulthood after adjusting for individual adult drug use. Methods: 650 young adult drug users were recruited through targeted street outreach and respondent-driven sampling in New York City (2006-2009). Baseline surveys ascertained demographics, network characteristics, drug use behaviors, and parental drug use during childhood. Negative binomial regression was used to evaluate this association. Results: The median age was 33 years, 22{\%} injected, 49{\%} were Black, and during childhood 26{\%} of mothers, 32{\%} of fathers, and 13{\%} of primary caregivers used drugs. After adjustment, having >1 parent who used drugs was associated with having a greater proportion of drug using (Adjusted Prevalence Ratio [APR] = 1.18; 95{\%}CI: 1.01-1.38) and specifically crack-smoking networks (APR = 1.71; 95{\%}CI: 1.21-2.43) in adulthood. Females' networks consisted of more drug users (APR = 1.18; 95{\%}CI: 1.01-1.38), injectors (APR = 1.44; 95{\%}CI: 1.09-1.90), crack smokers (APR = 1.48; 95{\%}CI: 1.18-1.87) and heroin users (APR = 1.43; 95{\%}CI: 1.13-1.81); blacks had a greater proportion of crack smoking (APR = 1.41; 95{\%}CI: 1.09-1.82), but a smaller proportion of injecting (APR = 0.64; 95{\%}CI: 0.43-0.94) and heroin smoking (APR = 0.60; 95{\%}CI: 0.47-0.77) networks as adults. Conclusions: These data suggest that parental drug use is independently associated with having drug-using networks in adulthood. Interventions that target parents and caregivers and that promote drug cessation could impede risky network formation in both adolescents and adults.",
keywords = "Drug use, Parent drug use, Peer influence, Racial disparities, Social networks",
author = "Rudolph, {Abby E.} and Jones, {Kandice C.} and Latkin, {Carl A} and Crawford, {Natalie D.} and Fuller, {Crystal M.}",
year = "2011",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2011.05.003",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "118",
pages = "437--443",
journal = "Drug and Alcohol Dependence",
issn = "0376-8716",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "2-3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The association between parental risk behaviors during childhood and having high risk networks in adulthood

AU - Rudolph, Abby E.

AU - Jones, Kandice C.

AU - Latkin, Carl A

AU - Crawford, Natalie D.

AU - Fuller, Crystal M.

PY - 2011/11/1

Y1 - 2011/11/1

N2 - Background: Prior research suggests that both social networks and parent drug use influence individual drug use among adolescents and that peers continue to influence drug use among adults. This analysis aims to determine whether parent drug use during childhood is associated with having drug-using networks in adulthood after adjusting for individual adult drug use. Methods: 650 young adult drug users were recruited through targeted street outreach and respondent-driven sampling in New York City (2006-2009). Baseline surveys ascertained demographics, network characteristics, drug use behaviors, and parental drug use during childhood. Negative binomial regression was used to evaluate this association. Results: The median age was 33 years, 22% injected, 49% were Black, and during childhood 26% of mothers, 32% of fathers, and 13% of primary caregivers used drugs. After adjustment, having >1 parent who used drugs was associated with having a greater proportion of drug using (Adjusted Prevalence Ratio [APR] = 1.18; 95%CI: 1.01-1.38) and specifically crack-smoking networks (APR = 1.71; 95%CI: 1.21-2.43) in adulthood. Females' networks consisted of more drug users (APR = 1.18; 95%CI: 1.01-1.38), injectors (APR = 1.44; 95%CI: 1.09-1.90), crack smokers (APR = 1.48; 95%CI: 1.18-1.87) and heroin users (APR = 1.43; 95%CI: 1.13-1.81); blacks had a greater proportion of crack smoking (APR = 1.41; 95%CI: 1.09-1.82), but a smaller proportion of injecting (APR = 0.64; 95%CI: 0.43-0.94) and heroin smoking (APR = 0.60; 95%CI: 0.47-0.77) networks as adults. Conclusions: These data suggest that parental drug use is independently associated with having drug-using networks in adulthood. Interventions that target parents and caregivers and that promote drug cessation could impede risky network formation in both adolescents and adults.

AB - Background: Prior research suggests that both social networks and parent drug use influence individual drug use among adolescents and that peers continue to influence drug use among adults. This analysis aims to determine whether parent drug use during childhood is associated with having drug-using networks in adulthood after adjusting for individual adult drug use. Methods: 650 young adult drug users were recruited through targeted street outreach and respondent-driven sampling in New York City (2006-2009). Baseline surveys ascertained demographics, network characteristics, drug use behaviors, and parental drug use during childhood. Negative binomial regression was used to evaluate this association. Results: The median age was 33 years, 22% injected, 49% were Black, and during childhood 26% of mothers, 32% of fathers, and 13% of primary caregivers used drugs. After adjustment, having >1 parent who used drugs was associated with having a greater proportion of drug using (Adjusted Prevalence Ratio [APR] = 1.18; 95%CI: 1.01-1.38) and specifically crack-smoking networks (APR = 1.71; 95%CI: 1.21-2.43) in adulthood. Females' networks consisted of more drug users (APR = 1.18; 95%CI: 1.01-1.38), injectors (APR = 1.44; 95%CI: 1.09-1.90), crack smokers (APR = 1.48; 95%CI: 1.18-1.87) and heroin users (APR = 1.43; 95%CI: 1.13-1.81); blacks had a greater proportion of crack smoking (APR = 1.41; 95%CI: 1.09-1.82), but a smaller proportion of injecting (APR = 0.64; 95%CI: 0.43-0.94) and heroin smoking (APR = 0.60; 95%CI: 0.47-0.77) networks as adults. Conclusions: These data suggest that parental drug use is independently associated with having drug-using networks in adulthood. Interventions that target parents and caregivers and that promote drug cessation could impede risky network formation in both adolescents and adults.

KW - Drug use

KW - Parent drug use

KW - Peer influence

KW - Racial disparities

KW - Social networks

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=80053563266&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=80053563266&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2011.05.003

DO - 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2011.05.003

M3 - Article

C2 - 21632187

AN - SCOPUS:80053563266

VL - 118

SP - 437

EP - 443

JO - Drug and Alcohol Dependence

JF - Drug and Alcohol Dependence

SN - 0376-8716

IS - 2-3

ER -