The Association Between Malaria, Blood Transfusions, and HIV Seropositivity in a Pediatric Population in Kinshasa, Zaire

Alan E. Greenberg, Phuc Nguyen Dinh, Jonathan M. Mann, Ndoko Kabote, Robert L. Colebunders, Henry Francis, Thomas C Quinn, Paola Baudoux, Bongo Lyamba, Farzin Davachi, Jacquelin M. Roberts, Ngandu Kabeya, James W. Curran, Carlos C. Campbell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Since Plasmodium falciparum malaria is a frequent cause of anemia among African children, and blood transfusions, unscreened for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody, are used frequently in the treatment of children with severe malaria, the relationships between malaria, transfusions, and HIV seropositivity were investigated in a pediatric population in Kinshasa, Zaire. In a cross-sectional survey of 167 hospitalized children, 112 (67%) had malaria, 78 (47%) had received transfusions during the current hospitalization, and 21 (13%) were HIV seropositive. Ten of the 11 seropositive malaria patients had received transfusions during the current hospitalization; pretransfusion specimens were available for four of these children and were seronegative. Of all blood transfusions, 87% were administered to malaria patients, and there was a strong dose-response association between transfusions and HIV seropositivity. A review of 1000 emergency ward records demonstrated that 69% of transfusions were administered to malaria patients, and 97% of children who received transfusions had pretransfusion hematocrits of 0.25 or less (≤25%). The treatment of malaria with blood transfusions is an important factor in the exposure of Kinshasa children to HIV infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)545-549
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Medical Association
Volume259
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 22 1988
Externally publishedYes

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Democratic Republic of the Congo
Blood Transfusion
Malaria
HIV
Pediatrics
Population
Hospitalization
Hospitalized Child
Falciparum Malaria
Virus Diseases
Hematocrit
Hospital Emergency Service
Anemia
Cross-Sectional Studies
Antibodies
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Greenberg, A. E., Nguyen Dinh, P., Mann, J. M., Kabote, N., Colebunders, R. L., Francis, H., ... Campbell, C. C. (1988). The Association Between Malaria, Blood Transfusions, and HIV Seropositivity in a Pediatric Population in Kinshasa, Zaire. Journal of the American Medical Association, 259(4), 545-549. https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.1988.03720040037023

The Association Between Malaria, Blood Transfusions, and HIV Seropositivity in a Pediatric Population in Kinshasa, Zaire. / Greenberg, Alan E.; Nguyen Dinh, Phuc; Mann, Jonathan M.; Kabote, Ndoko; Colebunders, Robert L.; Francis, Henry; Quinn, Thomas C; Baudoux, Paola; Lyamba, Bongo; Davachi, Farzin; Roberts, Jacquelin M.; Kabeya, Ngandu; Curran, James W.; Campbell, Carlos C.

In: Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 259, No. 4, 22.01.1988, p. 545-549.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Greenberg, AE, Nguyen Dinh, P, Mann, JM, Kabote, N, Colebunders, RL, Francis, H, Quinn, TC, Baudoux, P, Lyamba, B, Davachi, F, Roberts, JM, Kabeya, N, Curran, JW & Campbell, CC 1988, 'The Association Between Malaria, Blood Transfusions, and HIV Seropositivity in a Pediatric Population in Kinshasa, Zaire', Journal of the American Medical Association, vol. 259, no. 4, pp. 545-549. https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.1988.03720040037023
Greenberg, Alan E. ; Nguyen Dinh, Phuc ; Mann, Jonathan M. ; Kabote, Ndoko ; Colebunders, Robert L. ; Francis, Henry ; Quinn, Thomas C ; Baudoux, Paola ; Lyamba, Bongo ; Davachi, Farzin ; Roberts, Jacquelin M. ; Kabeya, Ngandu ; Curran, James W. ; Campbell, Carlos C. / The Association Between Malaria, Blood Transfusions, and HIV Seropositivity in a Pediatric Population in Kinshasa, Zaire. In: Journal of the American Medical Association. 1988 ; Vol. 259, No. 4. pp. 545-549.
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