The association between hearing loss and social isolation in older adults

Paul Mick, Ichiro Kawachi, Frank Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective. To determine if age-related hearing loss is associated with social isolation and whether factors such as age, gender, income, race, or hearing aid use moderated the association. Study Design. Cross-sectional. Setting. Randomly sampled United States communities. Subjects and Methods. Cross-sectional data on adults 60 to 84 years old from the 1999 to 2006 cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were analyzed. The dependent variable was social isolation, which was defined using the social isolation score (SIS), a 4-point composite index consisting of items pertaining to strength of social network and support. SIS scores ≥2 were considered indicative of social isolation. The independent (predictor) variable was the pure tone average of speech frequency (0.5-4 kHz) hearing thresholds in the better-hearing ear. Covariates included potential medical, demographic, and otologic confounders. We used multivariate logistic regression to evaluate the association between hearing loss and the odds of having social isolation. An exploratory analysis was performed to assess the strength of associations between hearing loss and individual items of the SIS scale. Results. Greater hearing loss was associated with increased odds of social isolation in women aged 60 to 69 years (odds ratio [OR], 3.49 per 25-dB of hearing loss; 95% confidence interval, 1.91, 6.39; P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)378-384
Number of pages7
JournalOtolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
Volume150
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2014

Fingerprint

Social Isolation
Hearing Loss
Social Support
Hearing
Hearing Aids
Nutrition Surveys
Ear
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Demography
Confidence Intervals

Keywords

  • aging
  • hearing disorders
  • hearing loss
  • presbycusis
  • social isolation
  • social network
  • social support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Surgery

Cite this

The association between hearing loss and social isolation in older adults. / Mick, Paul; Kawachi, Ichiro; Lin, Frank.

In: Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Vol. 150, No. 3, 03.2014, p. 378-384.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{d991eeae77694d7a8b77be1ade9ce79a,
title = "The association between hearing loss and social isolation in older adults",
abstract = "Objective. To determine if age-related hearing loss is associated with social isolation and whether factors such as age, gender, income, race, or hearing aid use moderated the association. Study Design. Cross-sectional. Setting. Randomly sampled United States communities. Subjects and Methods. Cross-sectional data on adults 60 to 84 years old from the 1999 to 2006 cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were analyzed. The dependent variable was social isolation, which was defined using the social isolation score (SIS), a 4-point composite index consisting of items pertaining to strength of social network and support. SIS scores ≥2 were considered indicative of social isolation. The independent (predictor) variable was the pure tone average of speech frequency (0.5-4 kHz) hearing thresholds in the better-hearing ear. Covariates included potential medical, demographic, and otologic confounders. We used multivariate logistic regression to evaluate the association between hearing loss and the odds of having social isolation. An exploratory analysis was performed to assess the strength of associations between hearing loss and individual items of the SIS scale. Results. Greater hearing loss was associated with increased odds of social isolation in women aged 60 to 69 years (odds ratio [OR], 3.49 per 25-dB of hearing loss; 95{\%} confidence interval, 1.91, 6.39; P",
keywords = "aging, hearing disorders, hearing loss, presbycusis, social isolation, social network, social support",
author = "Paul Mick and Ichiro Kawachi and Frank Lin",
year = "2014",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1177/0194599813518021",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "150",
pages = "378--384",
journal = "Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery",
issn = "0194-5998",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The association between hearing loss and social isolation in older adults

AU - Mick, Paul

AU - Kawachi, Ichiro

AU - Lin, Frank

PY - 2014/3

Y1 - 2014/3

N2 - Objective. To determine if age-related hearing loss is associated with social isolation and whether factors such as age, gender, income, race, or hearing aid use moderated the association. Study Design. Cross-sectional. Setting. Randomly sampled United States communities. Subjects and Methods. Cross-sectional data on adults 60 to 84 years old from the 1999 to 2006 cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were analyzed. The dependent variable was social isolation, which was defined using the social isolation score (SIS), a 4-point composite index consisting of items pertaining to strength of social network and support. SIS scores ≥2 were considered indicative of social isolation. The independent (predictor) variable was the pure tone average of speech frequency (0.5-4 kHz) hearing thresholds in the better-hearing ear. Covariates included potential medical, demographic, and otologic confounders. We used multivariate logistic regression to evaluate the association between hearing loss and the odds of having social isolation. An exploratory analysis was performed to assess the strength of associations between hearing loss and individual items of the SIS scale. Results. Greater hearing loss was associated with increased odds of social isolation in women aged 60 to 69 years (odds ratio [OR], 3.49 per 25-dB of hearing loss; 95% confidence interval, 1.91, 6.39; P

AB - Objective. To determine if age-related hearing loss is associated with social isolation and whether factors such as age, gender, income, race, or hearing aid use moderated the association. Study Design. Cross-sectional. Setting. Randomly sampled United States communities. Subjects and Methods. Cross-sectional data on adults 60 to 84 years old from the 1999 to 2006 cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were analyzed. The dependent variable was social isolation, which was defined using the social isolation score (SIS), a 4-point composite index consisting of items pertaining to strength of social network and support. SIS scores ≥2 were considered indicative of social isolation. The independent (predictor) variable was the pure tone average of speech frequency (0.5-4 kHz) hearing thresholds in the better-hearing ear. Covariates included potential medical, demographic, and otologic confounders. We used multivariate logistic regression to evaluate the association between hearing loss and the odds of having social isolation. An exploratory analysis was performed to assess the strength of associations between hearing loss and individual items of the SIS scale. Results. Greater hearing loss was associated with increased odds of social isolation in women aged 60 to 69 years (odds ratio [OR], 3.49 per 25-dB of hearing loss; 95% confidence interval, 1.91, 6.39; P

KW - aging

KW - hearing disorders

KW - hearing loss

KW - presbycusis

KW - social isolation

KW - social network

KW - social support

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84896861212&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84896861212&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0194599813518021

DO - 10.1177/0194599813518021

M3 - Article

C2 - 24384545

AN - SCOPUS:84896861212

VL - 150

SP - 378

EP - 384

JO - Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

JF - Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

SN - 0194-5998

IS - 3

ER -