The Association Between Changes in Alcohol Use and Changes in Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence and Viral Suppression Among Women Living with HIV

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Heavy alcohol use has adverse effects in women with HIV. We examined the association between changes in alcohol use (measured with Timeline Followback) and changes in antiretroviral therapy adherence (medication possession ratio) and viral suppression (HIV RNA), measured over 6-month intervals. Among women who were (1) non-adherent or not virologically suppressed and (2) infrequent binge drinkers or non-heavy drinkers at baseline, increasing drinking was significantly associated with lower odds of subsequently improving adherence or viral suppression (OR of becoming adherent of 0.90 in infrequent binge drinkers; OR of becoming suppressed of 0.81 and 0.75 in infrequent binge drinkers and non-heavy drinkers, respectively). Our findings suggest that for these women, increasing drinking may be a barrier to achieving viral suppression. Addressing this barrier by integrating proactive alcohol counseling strategies into routine HIV care may be key to improving viral suppression rates among women retained in HIV care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalAIDS and Behavior
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Oct 17 2016

Fingerprint

Alcohols
HIV
Drinking
Medication Adherence
Therapeutics
Counseling
RNA

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Antiretroviral medication adherence
  • HIV infection
  • Viral load
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

@article{3fd3ee04e3c046438a6af888880468ee,
title = "The Association Between Changes in Alcohol Use and Changes in Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence and Viral Suppression Among Women Living with HIV",
abstract = "Heavy alcohol use has adverse effects in women with HIV. We examined the association between changes in alcohol use (measured with Timeline Followback) and changes in antiretroviral therapy adherence (medication possession ratio) and viral suppression (HIV RNA), measured over 6-month intervals. Among women who were (1) non-adherent or not virologically suppressed and (2) infrequent binge drinkers or non-heavy drinkers at baseline, increasing drinking was significantly associated with lower odds of subsequently improving adherence or viral suppression (OR of becoming adherent of 0.90 in infrequent binge drinkers; OR of becoming suppressed of 0.81 and 0.75 in infrequent binge drinkers and non-heavy drinkers, respectively). Our findings suggest that for these women, increasing drinking may be a barrier to achieving viral suppression. Addressing this barrier by integrating proactive alcohol counseling strategies into routine HIV care may be key to improving viral suppression rates among women retained in HIV care.",
keywords = "Alcohol, Antiretroviral medication adherence, HIV infection, Viral load, Women",
author = "Nikita Barai and Anne Monroe and Catherine Lesko and Lau, {Bryan M} and Hutton, {Heidi E} and Cui Yang and Alvanzo, {Anika A.H.} and McCaul, {Mary Elizabeth} and Geetanjali Chander",
year = "2016",
month = "10",
day = "17",
doi = "10.1007/s10461-016-1580-x",
language = "English (US)",
pages = "1--10",
journal = "AIDS and Behavior",
issn = "1090-7165",
publisher = "Springer New York",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Association Between Changes in Alcohol Use and Changes in Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence and Viral Suppression Among Women Living with HIV

AU - Barai, Nikita

AU - Monroe, Anne

AU - Lesko, Catherine

AU - Lau, Bryan M

AU - Hutton, Heidi E

AU - Yang, Cui

AU - Alvanzo, Anika A.H.

AU - McCaul, Mary Elizabeth

AU - Chander, Geetanjali

PY - 2016/10/17

Y1 - 2016/10/17

N2 - Heavy alcohol use has adverse effects in women with HIV. We examined the association between changes in alcohol use (measured with Timeline Followback) and changes in antiretroviral therapy adherence (medication possession ratio) and viral suppression (HIV RNA), measured over 6-month intervals. Among women who were (1) non-adherent or not virologically suppressed and (2) infrequent binge drinkers or non-heavy drinkers at baseline, increasing drinking was significantly associated with lower odds of subsequently improving adherence or viral suppression (OR of becoming adherent of 0.90 in infrequent binge drinkers; OR of becoming suppressed of 0.81 and 0.75 in infrequent binge drinkers and non-heavy drinkers, respectively). Our findings suggest that for these women, increasing drinking may be a barrier to achieving viral suppression. Addressing this barrier by integrating proactive alcohol counseling strategies into routine HIV care may be key to improving viral suppression rates among women retained in HIV care.

AB - Heavy alcohol use has adverse effects in women with HIV. We examined the association between changes in alcohol use (measured with Timeline Followback) and changes in antiretroviral therapy adherence (medication possession ratio) and viral suppression (HIV RNA), measured over 6-month intervals. Among women who were (1) non-adherent or not virologically suppressed and (2) infrequent binge drinkers or non-heavy drinkers at baseline, increasing drinking was significantly associated with lower odds of subsequently improving adherence or viral suppression (OR of becoming adherent of 0.90 in infrequent binge drinkers; OR of becoming suppressed of 0.81 and 0.75 in infrequent binge drinkers and non-heavy drinkers, respectively). Our findings suggest that for these women, increasing drinking may be a barrier to achieving viral suppression. Addressing this barrier by integrating proactive alcohol counseling strategies into routine HIV care may be key to improving viral suppression rates among women retained in HIV care.

KW - Alcohol

KW - Antiretroviral medication adherence

KW - HIV infection

KW - Viral load

KW - Women

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84991666267&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84991666267&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10461-016-1580-x

DO - 10.1007/s10461-016-1580-x

M3 - Article

C2 - 27752873

AN - SCOPUS:84991666267

SP - 1

EP - 10

JO - AIDS and Behavior

JF - AIDS and Behavior

SN - 1090-7165

ER -