The Arizona cognitive test battery for down syndrome: Test-retest reliability & practice effects

Jamie O. Edgin, Payal Anand, Tracie Rosser, Elizabeth I. Pierpont, Carlos Figueroa, Debra Hamilton, Lillie Huddleston, Gina Mason, Goffredina Spaǹo, Lisa Toole, Mina Nguyen-Driver, George Capone, Leonard Abbeduto, Cheryl Maslen, Roger H. Reeves, Stephanie Sherman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A multisite study investigated the test-retest reliability and practice effects of a battery of assessments to measure neurocognitive function in individuals with Down syndrome (DS). The study aimed to establish the appropriateness of these measures as potential endpoints for clinical trials. Neurocognitive tasks and parent report measures comprising the Arizona Cognitive Test Battery (ACTB) were administered to 54 young participants with DS (7-20 years of age) with mild to moderate levels of intellectual disability in an initial baseline evaluation and a follow-up assessment 3 months later. Although revisions to ACTB measures are indicated, results demonstrate adequate levels of reliability and resistance to practice effects for some measures. The ACTB offers viable options for repeated testing of memory, motor planning, behavioral regulation, and attention. Alternative measures of executive functioning are required.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)215-234
Number of pages20
JournalAmerican Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Volume122
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2017

Fingerprint

Battery
Down Syndrome
Practice (Psychology)
Down syndrome
Test-retest reliability
Intellectual Disability
Clinical Trials
Intellectual disability
Appropriateness
Evaluation
Planning
Testing
Clinical trials

Keywords

  • Cerebellum
  • Clinical trials
  • Cognition
  • Down syndrome
  • Hippocampus
  • Intellectual disability
  • Memory
  • Neuropsychological assessment
  • Reliability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Medicine(all)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Edgin, J. O., Anand, P., Rosser, T., Pierpont, E. I., Figueroa, C., Hamilton, D., ... Sherman, S. (2017). The Arizona cognitive test battery for down syndrome: Test-retest reliability & practice effects. American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 122(3), 215-234. DOI: 10.1352/1944-7558-122.3.215

The Arizona cognitive test battery for down syndrome : Test-retest reliability & practice effects. / Edgin, Jamie O.; Anand, Payal; Rosser, Tracie; Pierpont, Elizabeth I.; Figueroa, Carlos; Hamilton, Debra; Huddleston, Lillie; Mason, Gina; Spaǹo, Goffredina; Toole, Lisa; Nguyen-Driver, Mina; Capone, George; Abbeduto, Leonard; Maslen, Cheryl; Reeves, Roger H.; Sherman, Stephanie.

In: American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Vol. 122, No. 3, 01.05.2017, p. 215-234.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Edgin, JO, Anand, P, Rosser, T, Pierpont, EI, Figueroa, C, Hamilton, D, Huddleston, L, Mason, G, Spaǹo, G, Toole, L, Nguyen-Driver, M, Capone, G, Abbeduto, L, Maslen, C, Reeves, RH & Sherman, S 2017, 'The Arizona cognitive test battery for down syndrome: Test-retest reliability & practice effects' American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, vol 122, no. 3, pp. 215-234. DOI: 10.1352/1944-7558-122.3.215
Edgin JO, Anand P, Rosser T, Pierpont EI, Figueroa C, Hamilton D et al. The Arizona cognitive test battery for down syndrome: Test-retest reliability & practice effects. American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. 2017 May 1;122(3):215-234. Available from, DOI: 10.1352/1944-7558-122.3.215

Edgin, Jamie O.; Anand, Payal; Rosser, Tracie; Pierpont, Elizabeth I.; Figueroa, Carlos; Hamilton, Debra; Huddleston, Lillie; Mason, Gina; Spaǹo, Goffredina; Toole, Lisa; Nguyen-Driver, Mina; Capone, George; Abbeduto, Leonard; Maslen, Cheryl; Reeves, Roger H.; Sherman, Stephanie / The Arizona cognitive test battery for down syndrome : Test-retest reliability & practice effects.

In: American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Vol. 122, No. 3, 01.05.2017, p. 215-234.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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