The antitumor immune response as a problem of self-nonself discrimination: Implications for immunotherapy

Paul Golumbek, Hy Levitsky, Liz Jaffee, Drew M. Pardoll

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Much evidence now exists that tumors possess specific antigens recognizable by T cells. The goal of immunotherapy is to break tolerance to these antiens while preserving self-tolerance. Recently, newer approaches have been developed in animal systems that modify tumor cells genetically so that they express new antigens or secrete certain cytokines. Engineering tumor cells to secrete cytokines in a paracrine fashion can induce powerful local cytokine effects which, in addition to inducing local inflammation, can alter the presentation of tumor antigens or the activation of tumor-antigen-specific T lymphocytes, resulting in systemic antitumor immunity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)183-192
Number of pages10
JournalImmunologic Research
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 1993

Keywords

  • Antitumor immune response
  • Immunotherapy
  • Self-nonself discrimination
  • T cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

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