The Anatomic Matrix as a Factor in Susceptibility to Lethal Arrhythmias in a Canine Model of Sudden Cardiac Death

Marianne J. Legato

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In a previously reported canine model of sudden cardiac death, its authors heavily weighted the role of the autonomic nervous system in determining whether or not a combined stress of submaximal exercise and ischemia would produced a fatal arrhythmia the setting of a healed anterior wall myocardial infarction. This morphologic study of that model reveals that anatomic factors are also relevant to vulnerability to sudden death: dogs who developed ventricular fibrillation in response to such a stress (susceptible) had significantly more of the left ventricle (LV) infarcted than dogs who survived the stress (resistant): 13.14% (± 2.67 S.E.M) as compared with 4.01% (± 2.11 S.E.M.). Moreover, areas of fibrosis were spread more widely throughout the ventricle and septum in susceptible as compared with resistant animals, which consistently showed more homogeneous areas of infarct largely confined to the apical portion of the LV. While the autonomic nervous system may well be relevant to survival to stress in an animal which has survived a myocardial infarction, we conclude that there are important anatomic factors which determine vulnerability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)501-508
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology
Volume25
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Autonomic Nervous System
Sudden Cardiac Death
Heart Ventricles
Canidae
Cardiac Arrhythmias
Anterior Wall Myocardial Infarction
Dogs
Anatomic Models
Ventricular Fibrillation
Sudden Death
Fibrosis
Ischemia
Myocardial Infarction

Keywords

  • Fatal (Lethal) arrhythmia
  • Myocardial infarction
  • Sudden cardiac death
  • Ventricular fibrillation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

The Anatomic Matrix as a Factor in Susceptibility to Lethal Arrhythmias in a Canine Model of Sudden Cardiac Death. / Legato, Marianne J.

In: Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology, Vol. 25, No. 5, 05.1993, p. 501-508.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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