The amino acid-induced alteration in renal hemodynamics is glucagon independent

T. M. Nammour, P. E. Williams, K. F. Badr, N. M. Abumrad, H. R. Jacobson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The amino acid-induced alteration in renal hemodynamics is glucagon independent. An oral protein load or i.v. administration of an amino acid solution results in an increase in glomerular filtration rate and renal plasma flow in both humans and animals. The change in renal hemodynamics has been attributed to the simultaneous induced rise in glucagon. Whether glucagon is necessary for the change in renal hemodynamics after an amino acid infusion was investigated. Two groups of dogs were used, and the experimental protocol was divided into four different periods (P1 through P4). Group I animals received an amino acid solution, and group II dogs received an equiosmolar solution of mannitol. In P1, the animals in both groups were hydrated with normal saline, whereas, in P2, the pancreatic clamp technique was used to fix the plasma glucagon levels. P2 served as a basal period in which measurements of glomerular filtration rate, renal plasma flow, and plasma glucagon were obtained. In P3, group I animals received amino acid solution, and group II received mannitol and served as controls. In this period, an increase of 32 and 27% in glomerular filtration rate and renal plasma flow, respectively, in group I dogs was observed, whereas there were no significant changes in these parameters in group II. During this period, plasma glucagon remained still at basal level in both groups. In P4, an infusion of glucagon at a rate of 5 ng/kg/min was added to both groups. This maneuver resulted in a fourfold increase in plasma glucagon levels in both groups. In group I, glomerular filtration rate did not increase further, whereas there was a near 25% further increment in renal plasma flow; however, in group II, glomerular filtration rate and renal plasma flow increased significantly from P3. It was concluded that administration of amino acid solution results in an increase in glomerular filtration rate and renal plasma flow independent of the rise in plasma glucagon.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)164-171
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Society of Nephrology
Volume2
Issue number2
StatePublished - Aug 1991
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Glucagon
Renal Plasma Flow
Hemodynamics
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Kidney
Amino Acids
Mannitol
Dogs

Keywords

  • Amino acid
  • Glomerular filtration rate
  • Glucagon
  • Renal plasma flow

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

Cite this

Nammour, T. M., Williams, P. E., Badr, K. F., Abumrad, N. M., & Jacobson, H. R. (1991). The amino acid-induced alteration in renal hemodynamics is glucagon independent. Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, 2(2), 164-171.

The amino acid-induced alteration in renal hemodynamics is glucagon independent. / Nammour, T. M.; Williams, P. E.; Badr, K. F.; Abumrad, N. M.; Jacobson, H. R.

In: Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, Vol. 2, No. 2, 08.1991, p. 164-171.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nammour, TM, Williams, PE, Badr, KF, Abumrad, NM & Jacobson, HR 1991, 'The amino acid-induced alteration in renal hemodynamics is glucagon independent', Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 164-171.
Nammour TM, Williams PE, Badr KF, Abumrad NM, Jacobson HR. The amino acid-induced alteration in renal hemodynamics is glucagon independent. Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. 1991 Aug;2(2):164-171.
Nammour, T. M. ; Williams, P. E. ; Badr, K. F. ; Abumrad, N. M. ; Jacobson, H. R. / The amino acid-induced alteration in renal hemodynamics is glucagon independent. In: Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. 1991 ; Vol. 2, No. 2. pp. 164-171.
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