The absence of task-related increases in BOLD signal does not equate to absence of task-related brain activation

Jiansong Xu, Vince Daniel Calhoun, Marc N. Potenza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Most fMRI studies employ general-linear-model-based analyses (GLM-BA) of BOLD signal changes to identify regions that are active (or not) during specific cognitive processes. However, alternate analytic approaches (like independent component analysis) may identify more complex patterns of activation, including in regions not implicated in GLM-BA of the same data. In our opinion, fMRI findings revealed by a GLM-BA cannot exclude any brain regions from contributing to specific cognitive processes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)125-127
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Neuroscience Methods
Volume240
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Linear Models
Brain
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Keywords

  • Balanced excitation and inhibition
  • Functional heterogeneity
  • General linear model
  • Spatial independent component analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

The absence of task-related increases in BOLD signal does not equate to absence of task-related brain activation. / Xu, Jiansong; Calhoun, Vince Daniel; Potenza, Marc N.

In: Journal of Neuroscience Methods, Vol. 240, 01.01.2015, p. 125-127.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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