The AAMC Standardized Video Interview and the Electronic Standardized Letter of Evaluation in Emergency Medicine: A Comparison of Performance Characteristics

Laura R. Hopson, Linda Regan, Michael C. Bond, Jeremy Branzetti, Elizabeth A. Samuels, Bobby Naemi, Dana Dunleavy, Michael A. Gisondi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

PURPOSE: To compare the performance characteristics of the electronic Standardized Letter of Evaluation (eSLOE), a widely used structured assessment of emergency medicine (EM) residency applicants, and the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) Standardized Video Interview (SVI), a new tool designed by the AAMC to assess interpersonal and communication skills and professionalism knowledge. METHOD: The authors matched EM residency applicants with valid SVI total scores and completed eSLOEs in the 2018 Match application cycle. They examined correlations and group differences for both tools, United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step exam scores, and honor society memberships. RESULTS: The matched sample included 2,884 applicants. SVI score and eSLOE global assessment ratings demonstrated small positive correlations approaching r = 0.20. eSLOE ratings had higher correlations with measures of academic ability (USMLE scores, academic honor society membership) than did SVI scores. Group differences were minimal for the SVI, with scores slightly favoring women (d = -0.21) and US-MD applicants (d = 0.23-0.42). Group differences in eSLOE ratings were small, favoring women over men (approaching d = -0.20) and white applicants over black applicants (approaching d = 0.40). CONCLUSIONS: Small positive correlations between SVI score and eSLOE global assessment ratings, alongside varying correlations with academic ability indicators, suggest these are complementary tools. Findings suggest the eSLOE is subject to similar sources and degrees of bias as other common assessments; these group differences were not observed with the SVI. Further examination of both tools is necessary to understand their ability to predict clinical performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1513-1521
Number of pages9
JournalAcademic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
Volume94
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

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