The 6 "ws" of rapid response systems: Best practices for improving development, implementation, and evaluation

Elizabeth H. Lazzara, Lauren Benishek, Shirley C. Sonesh, Brady Patzer, Patricia Robinson, Ruth Wallace, Eduardo Salas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Delays in care have been cited as one of the primary contributors of preventable mortality; thus, quality patient safety is often contingent upon the delivery of timely clinical care. Rapid response systems (RRSs) have been touted as one mechanism to improve the ability of suitable staff to respond to deteriorating patients quickly and appropriately. Rapid response systems are defined as highly skilled individual(s) who mobilize quickly to provide medical care in response to clinical deterioration. While there is mounting evidence that RRSs are a valid strategy for managing obstetric emergencies, reducing adverse events, and improving patient safety, there remains limited insight into the practices underlying the development and execution of these systems. Therefore, the purpose of this article was to synthesize the literature and answer the primary questions necessary for successfully developing, implementing, and evaluating RRSs within inpatient settings - the Who, What, When, Where, Why, and How of RRSs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)207-218
Number of pages12
JournalCritical Care Nursing Quarterly
Volume37
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Patient Safety
Practice Guidelines
Obstetrics
Inpatients
Emergencies
Mortality

Keywords

  • best practices
  • outcomes
  • patient safety
  • rapid response systems

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care

Cite this

The 6 "ws" of rapid response systems : Best practices for improving development, implementation, and evaluation. / Lazzara, Elizabeth H.; Benishek, Lauren; Sonesh, Shirley C.; Patzer, Brady; Robinson, Patricia; Wallace, Ruth; Salas, Eduardo.

In: Critical Care Nursing Quarterly, Vol. 37, No. 2, 01.01.2014, p. 207-218.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lazzara, Elizabeth H. ; Benishek, Lauren ; Sonesh, Shirley C. ; Patzer, Brady ; Robinson, Patricia ; Wallace, Ruth ; Salas, Eduardo. / The 6 "ws" of rapid response systems : Best practices for improving development, implementation, and evaluation. In: Critical Care Nursing Quarterly. 2014 ; Vol. 37, No. 2. pp. 207-218.
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