Terconazole cream for non-Candida albicans fungal vaginitis: Results of a retrospective analysis

Geetika Sood, Paul Nyirjesy, M. Velma Weitz, Ashwin Chatwani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Although it is FDA-approved for use in vulvovaginal candidiasis caused by non-Candida albicans species, terconazole cream has not been studied in patients with these infections. We sought to assess the clinical and mycological efficacy of terconazole cream in women with non-C. albicans vaginitis. Methods: The records of patients who had received a 7-day course of terconazole cream for culture-proved non-C. albicans vaginitis were reviewed. Data with regard to patient demographics, clinical and mycologic response to therapy within 1 month of treatment, and outcome with other antifungal therapies were analyzed. Results: Twenty-eight patients received terconazole cream for non-C. albicans infections. Three patients did not return for follow-up. The median age was 45 years. Seven (28%) patients were nulliparous. The median duration of symptoms was 3 years. Nine patients (36%) had received terconazole within the 6 months prior to referral. Overall, there were 20 C. glabrata cases, 3 C. parapsilosis, and 2 C. lusitaniae. Fourteen (56%) patients achieved a mycologic cure; 11 (44%) noted a resolution of their symptoms. Prior terconazole use was not associated with treatment failure (P = 0.09). Ten failures received boric acid suppositories as subsequent treatment; a cure was effected in 4 (40%). Two of three patients (67%) were eventually cured with flucytosine cream. Five (20%) patients remained uncured. Conclusions: Terconazole cream may be an appropriate first-line treatment for non C. albicans vaginitis, even in patients who have previously received the drug.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)240-243
Number of pages4
JournalInfectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume8
Issue number5-6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

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terconazole
Vaginitis
Vulvovaginal Candidiasis
Flucytosine

Keywords

  • Antifungal therapies
  • Candidiasis
  • Vaginitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Terconazole cream for non-Candida albicans fungal vaginitis : Results of a retrospective analysis. / Sood, Geetika; Nyirjesy, Paul; Weitz, M. Velma; Chatwani, Ashwin.

In: Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 8, No. 5-6, 2000, p. 240-243.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: Although it is FDA-approved for use in vulvovaginal candidiasis caused by non-Candida albicans species, terconazole cream has not been studied in patients with these infections. We sought to assess the clinical and mycological efficacy of terconazole cream in women with non-C. albicans vaginitis. Methods: The records of patients who had received a 7-day course of terconazole cream for culture-proved non-C. albicans vaginitis were reviewed. Data with regard to patient demographics, clinical and mycologic response to therapy within 1 month of treatment, and outcome with other antifungal therapies were analyzed. Results: Twenty-eight patients received terconazole cream for non-C. albicans infections. Three patients did not return for follow-up. The median age was 45 years. Seven (28{\%}) patients were nulliparous. The median duration of symptoms was 3 years. Nine patients (36{\%}) had received terconazole within the 6 months prior to referral. Overall, there were 20 C. glabrata cases, 3 C. parapsilosis, and 2 C. lusitaniae. Fourteen (56{\%}) patients achieved a mycologic cure; 11 (44{\%}) noted a resolution of their symptoms. Prior terconazole use was not associated with treatment failure (P = 0.09). Ten failures received boric acid suppositories as subsequent treatment; a cure was effected in 4 (40{\%}). Two of three patients (67{\%}) were eventually cured with flucytosine cream. Five (20{\%}) patients remained uncured. Conclusions: Terconazole cream may be an appropriate first-line treatment for non C. albicans vaginitis, even in patients who have previously received the drug.",
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