Tennis after total knee arthroplasty

Michael A. Mont, Amar D. Rajadhyaksha, Jeff L. Marxen, Charles E. Silberstein, David S. Hungerford

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Abstract

In this study, patients who played tennis after undergoing a total knee arthroplasty were analyzed in terms of their functional abilities and degree of satisfaction. The patients were recruited by means of a questionnaire that was sent to players from lists supplied by the United States Tennis Association. The study group consisted of 28 men and 5 women (46 total knee replacements) with a mean age of 64 years. Only 21% (7 of 33) of the patients' surgeons approved of their patients undertaking tennis activity, with 45% (15 of 33) recommending only doubles tennis. At both 1 year and a mean of 7 years after arthroplasty, players were playing both singles and doubles tennis approximately three times per week (range, one to seven). All tennis players polled were satisfied with their knee arthroplasties and their ability to resume playing tennis. Because the study patients played at a high level, future studies are needed to determine the effect of tennis on the general population, which does not play at such a uniformly high level. The long-term (15 to 20 years) effect of tennis activity on the clinical and radiologic outcome of total knee arthroplasty also needs to be determined.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages163-166
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume30
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Tennis
Knee Replacement Arthroplasties
Aptitude
Arthroplasty
Population
Surveys and Questionnaires
Surgeons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Mont, M. A., Rajadhyaksha, A. D., Marxen, J. L., Silberstein, C. E., & Hungerford, D. S. (2002). Tennis after total knee arthroplasty. American Journal of Sports Medicine, 30(2), 163-166.

Tennis after total knee arthroplasty. / Mont, Michael A.; Rajadhyaksha, Amar D.; Marxen, Jeff L.; Silberstein, Charles E.; Hungerford, David S.

In: American Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol. 30, No. 2, 2002, p. 163-166.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Mont, MA, Rajadhyaksha, AD, Marxen, JL, Silberstein, CE & Hungerford, DS 2002, 'Tennis after total knee arthroplasty' American Journal of Sports Medicine, vol 30, no. 2, pp. 163-166.
Mont MA, Rajadhyaksha AD, Marxen JL, Silberstein CE, Hungerford DS. Tennis after total knee arthroplasty. American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2002;30(2):163-166.
Mont, Michael A. ; Rajadhyaksha, Amar D. ; Marxen, Jeff L. ; Silberstein, Charles E. ; Hungerford, David S./ Tennis after total knee arthroplasty. In: American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2002 ; Vol. 30, No. 2. pp. 163-166
@article{b84a2439f24a4fdeb319a966f9f0e812,
title = "Tennis after total knee arthroplasty",
abstract = "In this study, patients who played tennis after undergoing a total knee arthroplasty were analyzed in terms of their functional abilities and degree of satisfaction. The patients were recruited by means of a questionnaire that was sent to players from lists supplied by the United States Tennis Association. The study group consisted of 28 men and 5 women (46 total knee replacements) with a mean age of 64 years. Only 21% (7 of 33) of the patients' surgeons approved of their patients undertaking tennis activity, with 45% (15 of 33) recommending only doubles tennis. At both 1 year and a mean of 7 years after arthroplasty, players were playing both singles and doubles tennis approximately three times per week (range, one to seven). All tennis players polled were satisfied with their knee arthroplasties and their ability to resume playing tennis. Because the study patients played at a high level, future studies are needed to determine the effect of tennis on the general population, which does not play at such a uniformly high level. The long-term (15 to 20 years) effect of tennis activity on the clinical and radiologic outcome of total knee arthroplasty also needs to be determined.",
author = "Mont, {Michael A.} and Rajadhyaksha, {Amar D.} and Marxen, {Jeff L.} and Silberstein, {Charles E.} and Hungerford, {David S.}",
year = "2002",
volume = "30",
pages = "163--166",
journal = "American Journal of Sports Medicine",
issn = "0363-5465",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Tennis after total knee arthroplasty

AU - Mont,Michael A.

AU - Rajadhyaksha,Amar D.

AU - Marxen,Jeff L.

AU - Silberstein,Charles E.

AU - Hungerford,David S.

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - In this study, patients who played tennis after undergoing a total knee arthroplasty were analyzed in terms of their functional abilities and degree of satisfaction. The patients were recruited by means of a questionnaire that was sent to players from lists supplied by the United States Tennis Association. The study group consisted of 28 men and 5 women (46 total knee replacements) with a mean age of 64 years. Only 21% (7 of 33) of the patients' surgeons approved of their patients undertaking tennis activity, with 45% (15 of 33) recommending only doubles tennis. At both 1 year and a mean of 7 years after arthroplasty, players were playing both singles and doubles tennis approximately three times per week (range, one to seven). All tennis players polled were satisfied with their knee arthroplasties and their ability to resume playing tennis. Because the study patients played at a high level, future studies are needed to determine the effect of tennis on the general population, which does not play at such a uniformly high level. The long-term (15 to 20 years) effect of tennis activity on the clinical and radiologic outcome of total knee arthroplasty also needs to be determined.

AB - In this study, patients who played tennis after undergoing a total knee arthroplasty were analyzed in terms of their functional abilities and degree of satisfaction. The patients were recruited by means of a questionnaire that was sent to players from lists supplied by the United States Tennis Association. The study group consisted of 28 men and 5 women (46 total knee replacements) with a mean age of 64 years. Only 21% (7 of 33) of the patients' surgeons approved of their patients undertaking tennis activity, with 45% (15 of 33) recommending only doubles tennis. At both 1 year and a mean of 7 years after arthroplasty, players were playing both singles and doubles tennis approximately three times per week (range, one to seven). All tennis players polled were satisfied with their knee arthroplasties and their ability to resume playing tennis. Because the study patients played at a high level, future studies are needed to determine the effect of tennis on the general population, which does not play at such a uniformly high level. The long-term (15 to 20 years) effect of tennis activity on the clinical and radiologic outcome of total knee arthroplasty also needs to be determined.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036129388&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036129388&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 30

SP - 163

EP - 166

JO - American Journal of Sports Medicine

T2 - American Journal of Sports Medicine

JF - American Journal of Sports Medicine

SN - 0363-5465

IS - 2

ER -