Temporary inactivation of the medial prefrontal cortex impairs the formation, but not the retrieval of social odor recognition memory in rats

Siobhan Robinson, Lauren Granata, Robert D Hienz, Catherine Davis-Takacs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The hippocampus, medial dorsal thalamus and the perirhinal and entorhinal cortices are essential for visual recognition memory whereas the neural substrates underlying olfactory recognition memories are less well characterized. In the present study we combined chemogenetic inactivation with a social odor recognition memory (SORM) task to test the hypothesis that the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is involved in recognition memory. We demonstrate that temporary chemogenetic inactivation of the mPFC prior to an encoding session impairs social odor recognition memory, whereas silencing the mPFC just prior to the recognition session was without effect. Our data support the critical role of the mPFC in the formation rather than retrieval of social odor memory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)115-121
Number of pages7
JournalNeurobiology of Learning and Memory
Volume161
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2019

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Prefrontal Cortex
Entorhinal Cortex
Thalamus
Recognition (Psychology)
Odorants
Hippocampus

Keywords

  • Chemogenetics
  • Prefrontal cortex
  • Recognition memory
  • Social odor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

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abstract = "The hippocampus, medial dorsal thalamus and the perirhinal and entorhinal cortices are essential for visual recognition memory whereas the neural substrates underlying olfactory recognition memories are less well characterized. In the present study we combined chemogenetic inactivation with a social odor recognition memory (SORM) task to test the hypothesis that the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is involved in recognition memory. We demonstrate that temporary chemogenetic inactivation of the mPFC prior to an encoding session impairs social odor recognition memory, whereas silencing the mPFC just prior to the recognition session was without effect. Our data support the critical role of the mPFC in the formation rather than retrieval of social odor memory.",
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AB - The hippocampus, medial dorsal thalamus and the perirhinal and entorhinal cortices are essential for visual recognition memory whereas the neural substrates underlying olfactory recognition memories are less well characterized. In the present study we combined chemogenetic inactivation with a social odor recognition memory (SORM) task to test the hypothesis that the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is involved in recognition memory. We demonstrate that temporary chemogenetic inactivation of the mPFC prior to an encoding session impairs social odor recognition memory, whereas silencing the mPFC just prior to the recognition session was without effect. Our data support the critical role of the mPFC in the formation rather than retrieval of social odor memory.

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