Temple monkeys and health implications of commensalism, Kathmandu, Nepal

Lisa Jones-Engel, Gregory A. Engel, John Heidrich, Mukesh Chalise, Narayan Poudel, Raphael Viscidi, Peter A. Barry, Jonathan S. Allan, Richard Grant, Randy Kyes

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Abstract

The threat of zoonotic transmission of infectious agents at monkey temples highlights the necessity of investigating the prevalence of enzootic infectious agents in these primate populations. Biological samples were collected from 39 rhesus macaques at the Swoyambhu Temple and tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot, polymerase chain reaction, or combination of these tests for evidence of infection with rhesus cytomegalovirus (RhCMV), Cercopithecine herpesvirus 1 (CHV-1), simian virus 40 (SV40), simian retrovirus (SRV), simian T-cell lymphotropic virus (STLV), simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and simian foamy virus (SFV). Antibody seroprevalence was 94.9% to RhCMV (37/39), 89.7% to SV40 (35/39), 64.1% to CHV-1 (25/39), and 97.4% to SFV (38/39). Humans who come into contact with macaques at Swoyambhu risk exposure to enzootic primateborne viruses. We discuss implications for public health and primate management strategies that would reduce contact between humans and primates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)900-906
Number of pages7
JournalEmerging infectious diseases
Volume12
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Jones-Engel, L., Engel, G. A., Heidrich, J., Chalise, M., Poudel, N., Viscidi, R., Barry, P. A., Allan, J. S., Grant, R., & Kyes, R. (2006). Temple monkeys and health implications of commensalism, Kathmandu, Nepal. Emerging infectious diseases, 12(6), 900-906. https://doi.org/10.3201/eid1206.060030