Temperature and direct effects on population health in Brisbane, 1986-1995

Peng Bi, Kevin A. Parton, Jian Wang, Ken Donald

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

To assess the impact of weather on human mortality, particularly among elderly people and people with diseases, the authors conducted an ecological study in Brisbane, Australia. Correlation and autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) regression analyses assessed the relationship between weather and mortality in the general population and the elderly population (65 years of age and older) over the period 1986-1995. In the summer, both cardiovascular diseases and all-cause mortality in the elderly population had significant positive correlations with monthly temperatures. In the winter, negative correlations were found between monthly mean maximum temperatures and cardiovascular-disease mortality, and between monthly mean minimum temperatures and respiratory-disease mortality. Regression models were developed for various target populations and produced similar results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)48-53
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Environmental Health
Volume70
Issue number8
StatePublished - Apr 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Health
mortality
Temperature
Mortality
elderly population
Population
cardiovascular disease
Weather
Pulmonary diseases
temperature
Cardiovascular Diseases
weather
respiratory disease
Health Services Needs and Demand
Regression Analysis
effect
health
winter
summer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Bi, P., Parton, K. A., Wang, J., & Donald, K. (2008). Temperature and direct effects on population health in Brisbane, 1986-1995. Journal of Environmental Health, 70(8), 48-53.

Temperature and direct effects on population health in Brisbane, 1986-1995. / Bi, Peng; Parton, Kevin A.; Wang, Jian; Donald, Ken.

In: Journal of Environmental Health, Vol. 70, No. 8, 04.2008, p. 48-53.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bi, P, Parton, KA, Wang, J & Donald, K 2008, 'Temperature and direct effects on population health in Brisbane, 1986-1995', Journal of Environmental Health, vol. 70, no. 8, pp. 48-53.
Bi, Peng ; Parton, Kevin A. ; Wang, Jian ; Donald, Ken. / Temperature and direct effects on population health in Brisbane, 1986-1995. In: Journal of Environmental Health. 2008 ; Vol. 70, No. 8. pp. 48-53.
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