Telephone Call-in Services for Children in Self-care

Rickey L. Williams, Patricia D. Fosarelli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

An estimated 8 to 10 million American hildren younger than 18 years of age are in self-care before or after school. Telephone call-in services to provide adult contact for these children when telephone contact with their parents Is impossible or not feasible have been developed in more than 100 cities throughout the country. This study describes 2082 calls received by Tucson's KIDLINE and 2208 calls received by Baltimore's KIDSLINE. The mean age of the callers was 9.7 years, with twice as many girls as boys calling. Loneliness or boredom accounted for 68% of the calls, with fewer calls for help with homework (8%), interpersonal problems (6%), medical problems (3%), and fears (2%). Medical calls were mostly for minor Infectious [ill]llness; there were no calls for life-threat[ill]ening emergencies. We discuss the pos[ill]sible implications for pediatric practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)965-968
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Diseases of Children
Volume141
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 1987

Fingerprint

Self Care
Telephone
Boredom
Loneliness
Baltimore
Fear
Emergencies
Parents
Pediatrics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Telephone Call-in Services for Children in Self-care. / Williams, Rickey L.; Fosarelli, Patricia D.

In: American Journal of Diseases of Children, Vol. 141, No. 9, 1987, p. 965-968.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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