Techniques used by smokers during contingency motivated smoking reduction

Thomas A. Burling, Maxine L Stitzer, George Bigelow, Nason W. Russ

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study investigated the smoking reduction strategies used by smokers who were not enrolled in formal treatment. Twenty-four smokers were interviewed following a study in which they were contingently reinforced for reductions in alveolar carbon monoxide levels but not provided with specific reduction strategies. Results indicated that smokers who consumed more food or liquids to avoid smoking and/or who avoided other related substances such as alcohol and coffee were more successful in reducing carbon monoxide levels than subjects who did not use these techniques (p <0.05). Conversely, subjects who stated that they attempted to reduce without a specific plan were less successful in reducing carbon monoxide levels (p <0.05).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)397-401
Number of pages5
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume7
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1982

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Carbon Monoxide
Smoking
Coffee
Alcohols
Food
Liquids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Techniques used by smokers during contingency motivated smoking reduction. / Burling, Thomas A.; Stitzer, Maxine L; Bigelow, George; Russ, Nason W.

In: Addictive Behaviors, Vol. 7, No. 4, 1982, p. 397-401.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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