Teaching to varied disciplines and educational levels simultaneously

An innovative approach in a neonatal follow-up clinic

Mary Loretta Leppert, Vera J. Burton, Rebecca A. German, Maura B. Gentner, Doris P. Yimgang, Belinda Yim Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: Across various health conditions and geographic regions, there remains a dearth of clinicians with the expertise and confidence to identify and manage children with disabilities. At the front line of this crisis are clinician-educators, who are tasked with caring for these unique patients and with training the future workforce. Balancing patient care and clinical instruction responsibilities is particularly challenging when trainees of varied educational levels and specialties report simultaneously. The lack of a standard curriculum further compounds the clinician-educator’s teaching demands and threatens the consistency of trainees’ learning. Recognizing these challenges in their work in a neonatal follow-up clinic, the authors sought a solution through an established curriculum development process. Materials and methods: A needs assessment survey was conducted to gauge medical trainees’ knowledge, skills, and experiences. Applying needs assessment findings, the authors developed a curriculum, which was administered online to several trainee cohorts just prior to rotations in the neonatal follow-up clinic. Results: After completing the curriculum, trainees scored significantly higher on neonatal follow-up knowledge tests. Conclusions: Providing advance exposure helped to ensure that trainees arrived with comparable basal knowledge, which served as a foundation for more advanced instruction. This curricular approach may be useful across teaching venues, especially those with multi-level or multi-discipline learners.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalMedical Teacher
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Dec 4 2017

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trainee
Teaching
curriculum
educator
instruction
curriculum development
patient care
expertise
confidence
disability
responsibility
lack
health
learning
experience

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

Teaching to varied disciplines and educational levels simultaneously : An innovative approach in a neonatal follow-up clinic. / Leppert, Mary Loretta; Burton, Vera J.; German, Rebecca A.; Gentner, Maura B.; Yimgang, Doris P.; Chen, Belinda Yim.

In: Medical Teacher, 04.12.2017, p. 1-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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