Teaching subcuticular suturing to medical students: Video versus expert instructor feedback

Stuart H. Shippey, Tiffany L. Chen, Betty Chou, Leise R. Knoepp, Craig W. Bowen, Victoria L Handa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Given limitations in surgical educational resources, more efficient teaching methods are needed. We sought to evaluate 3 strategies for improving skills in subcuticular suturingpractice with an instructional video, practice with expert instructor supervision, and independent practice. Design: Fifty-eight medical students volunteered for this research. Students viewed a video on subcuticular suturing then completed a pretest requiring closure of an incision in a plastic model. Students were randomized among 3 groups: practice with an instructional video (group A), practice with supervision by an expert instructor (group B), and independent practice (group C). After instruction, students completed a posttest, then a retention test 1 week later. Their performances were video recorded and evaluated using a validated scoring instrument composed of global and task-specific subscales. Results: Performances measured using both subscales improved significantly from pretest to post-test only for group B. However, when comparing student performances between pretest and retention posttest, significant improvements on both subscales were seen only in group A. Conclusion: These results suggest that practice with an instructional video is an effective method for acquiring skill in subcuticular suturing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)397-402
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Surgical Education
Volume68
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2011

Fingerprint

Medical Students
medical student
instructor
Teaching
video
expert
Students
group practice
supervision
Group
Group Practice
student
performance
Plastics
teaching method
instruction
Research
resources

Keywords

  • anatomic models
  • instructional films and videos
  • medical students
  • motor skills
  • sutures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Education

Cite this

Teaching subcuticular suturing to medical students : Video versus expert instructor feedback. / Shippey, Stuart H.; Chen, Tiffany L.; Chou, Betty; Knoepp, Leise R.; Bowen, Craig W.; Handa, Victoria L.

In: Journal of Surgical Education, Vol. 68, No. 5, 09.2011, p. 397-402.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shippey, Stuart H. ; Chen, Tiffany L. ; Chou, Betty ; Knoepp, Leise R. ; Bowen, Craig W. ; Handa, Victoria L. / Teaching subcuticular suturing to medical students : Video versus expert instructor feedback. In: Journal of Surgical Education. 2011 ; Vol. 68, No. 5. pp. 397-402.
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