Teaching Integrative Medicine to Residents: A Focus on Populations Rather Than Individual Patients

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Abstract

Introduction Integrative medicine (IM) is by its very definition patient centric: "It reaffirms the importance of the relationship between practitioner and patient, focuses on the whole person, is informed by evidence, and makes use of all appropriate therapeutic approaches." Best methods for teaching IM in residency have not been well described. Methods An IM curriculum for preventive medicine (PM) residents was thoughtfully developed and iteratively revised using Kern's six-step approach. The centerpiece of this curriculum was to have learners work collaboratively within teams on projects that would facilitate IM-focused care within primary care practices. Before embarking on specific IM-related projects, residents immersed themselves within the practices to understand the needs of the community. Results Forty-eight PM residents have participated in the curriculum in the last 3 years, and 27 unique physician preceptors served as mentors for the projects. Both residents and preceptors enjoyed working on the projects, and both groups considered the work to be a valuable educational pursuit. Common IM content areas covered by the projects dealt with interprofessional collaboration, health promotion, and population-based prevention. Although there were challenges associated with implementation of the projects, overcoming these enhanced the PM residents' confidence and ability to serve as agents of change. Conclusions An IM curriculum was successfully incorporated into a PM residency program. The focus on serving the community, or a population health approach, may not be the most common approach in IM, but it worked effectively to enhance the IM knowledge and skills of PM residents.

LanguageEnglish (US)
PagesS285-S289
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume49
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2015

Fingerprint

Integrative Medicine
Teaching
Population
Preventive Medicine
Curriculum
Internship and Residency
Mentors
Health Promotion
Primary Health Care
Physicians
Health
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

@article{f5252501ef3d4b0f9f07878513941961,
title = "Teaching Integrative Medicine to Residents: A Focus on Populations Rather Than Individual Patients",
abstract = "Introduction Integrative medicine (IM) is by its very definition patient centric: {"}It reaffirms the importance of the relationship between practitioner and patient, focuses on the whole person, is informed by evidence, and makes use of all appropriate therapeutic approaches.{"} Best methods for teaching IM in residency have not been well described. Methods An IM curriculum for preventive medicine (PM) residents was thoughtfully developed and iteratively revised using Kern's six-step approach. The centerpiece of this curriculum was to have learners work collaboratively within teams on projects that would facilitate IM-focused care within primary care practices. Before embarking on specific IM-related projects, residents immersed themselves within the practices to understand the needs of the community. Results Forty-eight PM residents have participated in the curriculum in the last 3 years, and 27 unique physician preceptors served as mentors for the projects. Both residents and preceptors enjoyed working on the projects, and both groups considered the work to be a valuable educational pursuit. Common IM content areas covered by the projects dealt with interprofessional collaboration, health promotion, and population-based prevention. Although there were challenges associated with implementation of the projects, overcoming these enhanced the PM residents' confidence and ability to serve as agents of change. Conclusions An IM curriculum was successfully incorporated into a PM residency program. The focus on serving the community, or a population health approach, may not be the most common approach in IM, but it worked effectively to enhance the IM knowledge and skills of PM residents.",
author = "Chaudry, {Sajida S.} and McGuire, {Maura J.} and Clarence Lam and Elham Hatef and Wright, {Scott M.} and Alexander, {Miriam H.}",
year = "2015",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1016/j.amepre.2015.08.001",
volume = "49",
pages = "S285--S289",
journal = "American Journal of Preventive Medicine",
issn = "0749-3797",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Teaching Integrative Medicine to Residents

T2 - American Journal of Preventive Medicine

AU - Chaudry,Sajida S.

AU - McGuire,Maura J.

AU - Lam,Clarence

AU - Hatef,Elham

AU - Wright,Scott M.

AU - Alexander,Miriam H.

PY - 2015/11/1

Y1 - 2015/11/1

N2 - Introduction Integrative medicine (IM) is by its very definition patient centric: "It reaffirms the importance of the relationship between practitioner and patient, focuses on the whole person, is informed by evidence, and makes use of all appropriate therapeutic approaches." Best methods for teaching IM in residency have not been well described. Methods An IM curriculum for preventive medicine (PM) residents was thoughtfully developed and iteratively revised using Kern's six-step approach. The centerpiece of this curriculum was to have learners work collaboratively within teams on projects that would facilitate IM-focused care within primary care practices. Before embarking on specific IM-related projects, residents immersed themselves within the practices to understand the needs of the community. Results Forty-eight PM residents have participated in the curriculum in the last 3 years, and 27 unique physician preceptors served as mentors for the projects. Both residents and preceptors enjoyed working on the projects, and both groups considered the work to be a valuable educational pursuit. Common IM content areas covered by the projects dealt with interprofessional collaboration, health promotion, and population-based prevention. Although there were challenges associated with implementation of the projects, overcoming these enhanced the PM residents' confidence and ability to serve as agents of change. Conclusions An IM curriculum was successfully incorporated into a PM residency program. The focus on serving the community, or a population health approach, may not be the most common approach in IM, but it worked effectively to enhance the IM knowledge and skills of PM residents.

AB - Introduction Integrative medicine (IM) is by its very definition patient centric: "It reaffirms the importance of the relationship between practitioner and patient, focuses on the whole person, is informed by evidence, and makes use of all appropriate therapeutic approaches." Best methods for teaching IM in residency have not been well described. Methods An IM curriculum for preventive medicine (PM) residents was thoughtfully developed and iteratively revised using Kern's six-step approach. The centerpiece of this curriculum was to have learners work collaboratively within teams on projects that would facilitate IM-focused care within primary care practices. Before embarking on specific IM-related projects, residents immersed themselves within the practices to understand the needs of the community. Results Forty-eight PM residents have participated in the curriculum in the last 3 years, and 27 unique physician preceptors served as mentors for the projects. Both residents and preceptors enjoyed working on the projects, and both groups considered the work to be a valuable educational pursuit. Common IM content areas covered by the projects dealt with interprofessional collaboration, health promotion, and population-based prevention. Although there were challenges associated with implementation of the projects, overcoming these enhanced the PM residents' confidence and ability to serve as agents of change. Conclusions An IM curriculum was successfully incorporated into a PM residency program. The focus on serving the community, or a population health approach, may not be the most common approach in IM, but it worked effectively to enhance the IM knowledge and skills of PM residents.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84944872655&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84944872655&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.amepre.2015.08.001

DO - 10.1016/j.amepre.2015.08.001

M3 - Article

VL - 49

SP - S285-S289

JO - American Journal of Preventive Medicine

JF - American Journal of Preventive Medicine

SN - 0749-3797

IS - 5

ER -