Teachers' and education support professionals' perspectives on bullying and prevention: Findings from a national education association study

Tracy E. Waasdorp, Lindsey M. O'Brennan, Michaela Gulemetova, Catherine P. Bradshaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Given growing concerns regarding the prevalence and seriousness of bullying, the National Education Association recently drew upon its membership to launch a national study of teachers' and education support professionals' perceptions of bullying, and need for additional training on bullying prevention efforts and school-wide policies. The data were collected from a representative sample of 5,064 National Education Association members (2,163 teachers and 2,901 education support professionals). Analyses indicated that compared to education support professionals, teachers were more likely to witness students being bullied, more likely to view bullying as a significant problem at their school, and were more likely to have students report bullying to them. Teachers were more likely to be involved in bullying policies at their school, yet both groups reported wanting more training related to cyberbullying and bullying related to students' sexual orientation, gender issues, and racial issues. Implications for school psychologists and the development of school-wide bullying prevention efforts are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)280-297
Number of pages18
JournalSchool Psychology Review
Volume42
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Education

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