Task-related variation in airborne concentrations of laboratory animal allergens: Studies with Rat n I

Peyton A. Eggleston, Carol A. Newill, Aftab A. Ansari, Anita Pustelnik, Sheau Rong Lou, Richard Evans, David G. Marsh, Joan L. Longbottom, Morton Corn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

To define airborne allergen exposure during various tasks with rats in a laboratory, concentrations of allergen Rat n I were measured by radioimmunoassay in extracts from filters in personal air sampling devices that were worn by laboratory workers while they were performing these tasks. The tasks included feeding, cage cleaning, handling, injection, surgery, and sacrifice. Median concentrations encountered during feeding or cleaning (21 ng/m3) and injection or handling (13 ng/m3) were higher than those associated with surgery or sacrifice (3.1 ng/m3; p < 0.01). Area samples in animal-holding rooms contained 3.4 ng/m3 during animal handling and 2.3 ng/m3 at other times. Very low concentrations were found in air outside the handling room, in unused laboratories, or outside air. We concluded that certain tasks incur a higher risk of allergen exposure but that exposure may occur anywhere within an animal laboratory environment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)347-352
Number of pages6
JournalThe Journal of allergy and clinical immunology
Volume84
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1989

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

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