Targeting tobacco in a community-based addiction recovery cohort: Results from a computerized, brief, randomized intervention trial

Alison B. Breland, Lauren Almond, Jennifer Kienzle, Steven J. Ondersma, Alton Hart, Michael Weaver, Pamela Dillon, Dace Svikis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Nearly 80% of substance dependent individuals also use tobacco, and smoking cessation efforts during treatment for other substance use is associated with similar or even improved outcomes. However, smoking cessation is not routinely addressed during treatment for substance use disorders. The present study tested a computerized brief motivational intervention (C-BMI) for smoking cessation in an understudied population: a cohort recruited from a recovery community organization (RCO) center. Methods: Following baseline assessment, participants were randomly assigned to either a 30-minute C-BMI plus access to free nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), or an information-only control group plus NRT access. Results: Reductions in CO were observed for both groups. Quit rates in the C-BMI group (5%-7%, vs. 0% for the control group) approximated those observed elsewhere for physician advice and minimal counseling. Participants in the C-BMI group were also more likely to express a desire to quit. Conclusions: Computer-delivered smoking cessation interventions within RCOs appear feasible. These organizations treat a wide variety of individuals, and C-BMIs for smoking in this context have the potential to reduce smoking-related morbidity and mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)113-120
Number of pages8
JournalContemporary Clinical Trials
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2014

Keywords

  • Brief interventions
  • Smoking cessation
  • Substance abuse recovery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)

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