Targeting the process of farynesylation for therapy of hematologic malignancies

Judith Karp, Jeffrey E. Lancet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In sum, the FTIs are signal transduction inhibitors that display promising clinical activity against a broad spectrum of malignancies. We are just beginning to explore and elucidate the mechanisms by which transformed cells respond to FTIs and the optimal settings in which they do so. The clinical trials that are currently in progress and under development will provide the critical foundations for defining the optimal roles of FTIs in patients with AML and other hematologic disorders. The correlative laboratory studies to define the mechanisms by which FTIs alter cellular metabolism and modulate the activities of specific signaling pathways in both normal and malignant marrow precursors are a pivotal part of this effort. What we learn about FTIs in the clinic and the laboratory will apply broadly to the effective and safe application of all signal transduction inhibitors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)643-652
Number of pages10
JournalCurrent Molecular Medicine
Volume5
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2005

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Signal transduction
Hematologic Neoplasms
Signal Transduction
Metabolism
Bone Marrow
Clinical Trials
Therapeutics
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Targeting the process of farynesylation for therapy of hematologic malignancies. / Karp, Judith; Lancet, Jeffrey E.

In: Current Molecular Medicine, Vol. 5, No. 7, 11.2005, p. 643-652.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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