Targeting hepatic glucose metabolism in the treatment of type 2 diabetes

Amy K. Rines, Kfir Sharabi, Clint D J Tavares, Pere Puigserver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by the dysregulation of glucose homeostasis, resulting in hyperglycaemia. Although current diabetes treatments have exhibited some success in lowering blood glucose levels, their effect is not always sustained and their use may be associated with undesirable side effects, such as hypoglycaemia. Novel antidiabetic drugs, which may be used in combination with existing therapies, are therefore needed. The potential of specifically targeting the liver to normalize blood glucose levels has not been fully exploited. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms controlling hepatic gluconeogenesis and glycogen storage, and assess the prospect of therapeutically targeting associated pathways to treat type 2 diabetes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalNature Reviews Drug Discovery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Aug 12 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Blood Glucose
Glucose
Liver Glycogen
Gluconeogenesis
Liver
Hypoglycemia
Hypoglycemic Agents
Hyperglycemia
Homeostasis
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Pharmacology
  • Drug Discovery

Cite this

Targeting hepatic glucose metabolism in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. / Rines, Amy K.; Sharabi, Kfir; Tavares, Clint D J; Puigserver, Pere.

In: Nature Reviews Drug Discovery, 12.08.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rines, Amy K. ; Sharabi, Kfir ; Tavares, Clint D J ; Puigserver, Pere. / Targeting hepatic glucose metabolism in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In: Nature Reviews Drug Discovery. 2016.
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