Taenia solium infection in a rural community in the Peruvian Andes

P. L. Moro, L. Lopera, N. Bonifacio, Robert H Gilman, B. Silva, M. Verastegui, Armandoe Gonzalez, H. H. Garcia, L. Cabrera, J. Pretell, M. Tovar, A. Gonzalez, C. Gavidia, N. Falcon, T. Bernal, G. Herrera, J. Jimenez, S. Rodriguez, C. W. Tsang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

An epidemiological study was conducted in a highland, rural community, in Peru, to determine the seroprevalences of human and porcine infection with Taenia solium and the risk factors associated with human infection. The seroprevalences, determined using an assay based on enzyme-linked-immuno-electrotransfer blots (EITB), were 21% (66/316) in the humans and 65% (32/49) in the pigs. The human subjects aged <30 years were more likely to be positive for anti-T. solium antibodies than the older subjects (P <0.001). The risk factors associated with human seropositivity were lack of education beyond the elementary level [odds ratio (OR) = 2.69; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.09-6.65] and pig-raising (OR = 1.68; CI = 0.96-2.92). Curiously, sheep-raising was inversely associated with human T. solium infection (OR = 0.50; CI = 0.28-0.90). The study site appears to be a new endemic focus for T. solium in the central Peruvian Andes. Although, in earlier studies, the seroprevalence of T. solium infection has generally been found to increase with age, the opposite trend was observed in the present study. The results of follow-up studies should help determine if the relatively high seroprevalence in the young subjects of the present study is the result of a transient antibody response.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)373-379
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology
Volume97
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2003

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Taeniasis
Taenia solium
Rural Population
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Swine
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Peru
Infection
Antibody Formation
Epidemiologic Studies
Sheep
Education
Antibodies
Enzymes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology

Cite this

Moro, P. L., Lopera, L., Bonifacio, N., Gilman, R. H., Silva, B., Verastegui, M., ... Tsang, C. W. (2003). Taenia solium infection in a rural community in the Peruvian Andes. Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology, 97(4), 373-379. https://doi.org/10.1179/000349803235002371

Taenia solium infection in a rural community in the Peruvian Andes. / Moro, P. L.; Lopera, L.; Bonifacio, N.; Gilman, Robert H; Silva, B.; Verastegui, M.; Gonzalez, Armandoe; Garcia, H. H.; Cabrera, L.; Pretell, J.; Tovar, M.; Gonzalez, A.; Gavidia, C.; Falcon, N.; Bernal, T.; Herrera, G.; Jimenez, J.; Rodriguez, S.; Tsang, C. W.

In: Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology, Vol. 97, No. 4, 06.2003, p. 373-379.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moro, PL, Lopera, L, Bonifacio, N, Gilman, RH, Silva, B, Verastegui, M, Gonzalez, A, Garcia, HH, Cabrera, L, Pretell, J, Tovar, M, Gonzalez, A, Gavidia, C, Falcon, N, Bernal, T, Herrera, G, Jimenez, J, Rodriguez, S & Tsang, CW 2003, 'Taenia solium infection in a rural community in the Peruvian Andes', Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology, vol. 97, no. 4, pp. 373-379. https://doi.org/10.1179/000349803235002371
Moro, P. L. ; Lopera, L. ; Bonifacio, N. ; Gilman, Robert H ; Silva, B. ; Verastegui, M. ; Gonzalez, Armandoe ; Garcia, H. H. ; Cabrera, L. ; Pretell, J. ; Tovar, M. ; Gonzalez, A. ; Gavidia, C. ; Falcon, N. ; Bernal, T. ; Herrera, G. ; Jimenez, J. ; Rodriguez, S. ; Tsang, C. W. / Taenia solium infection in a rural community in the Peruvian Andes. In: Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology. 2003 ; Vol. 97, No. 4. pp. 373-379.
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abstract = "An epidemiological study was conducted in a highland, rural community, in Peru, to determine the seroprevalences of human and porcine infection with Taenia solium and the risk factors associated with human infection. The seroprevalences, determined using an assay based on enzyme-linked-immuno-electrotransfer blots (EITB), were 21{\%} (66/316) in the humans and 65{\%} (32/49) in the pigs. The human subjects aged <30 years were more likely to be positive for anti-T. solium antibodies than the older subjects (P <0.001). The risk factors associated with human seropositivity were lack of education beyond the elementary level [odds ratio (OR) = 2.69; 95{\%} confidence interval (CI) = 1.09-6.65] and pig-raising (OR = 1.68; CI = 0.96-2.92). Curiously, sheep-raising was inversely associated with human T. solium infection (OR = 0.50; CI = 0.28-0.90). The study site appears to be a new endemic focus for T. solium in the central Peruvian Andes. Although, in earlier studies, the seroprevalence of T. solium infection has generally been found to increase with age, the opposite trend was observed in the present study. The results of follow-up studies should help determine if the relatively high seroprevalence in the young subjects of the present study is the result of a transient antibody response.",
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AU - Lopera, L.

AU - Bonifacio, N.

AU - Gilman, Robert H

AU - Silva, B.

AU - Verastegui, M.

AU - Gonzalez, Armandoe

AU - Garcia, H. H.

AU - Cabrera, L.

AU - Pretell, J.

AU - Tovar, M.

AU - Gonzalez, A.

AU - Gavidia, C.

AU - Falcon, N.

AU - Bernal, T.

AU - Herrera, G.

AU - Jimenez, J.

AU - Rodriguez, S.

AU - Tsang, C. W.

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