Tackling mantle cell lymphoma (MCL): Potential benefit of allogeneic stem cell transplantation

Satish P Shanbhag, Mitchell R. Smith, Robert V B Emmons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a type of non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL) associated with poor progression-free and overall survival. There is a high relapse rate with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy. Intensive combination chemotherapy including rituximab, dose intense CHOP- (cyclophosphamide- doxorubicin-vincristine-prednisone) like regimens, high dose cytarabine, and/or consolidation with autologous stem cell transplant (autoSCT) have shown promise in significantly prolonging remissions. Data from phase II studies show that even in patients with chemotherapy refractory MCL, allogeneic stem cell transplant (alloSCT) can lead to long term disease control. Most patients with MCL are not candidates for myeloablative alloSCT due to their age, comorbidities, and performance status. The advent of less toxic reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens, which rely more on the graft-versus-lymphoma (GVL) effect, have expanded the population of patients who would be eligible for alloSCT. RIC regimens alter the balance of toxicity and efficacy favoring its use. Treatment decisions are complicated by introduction of novel agents which are attractive options for older, frail patients. Further studies are needed to determine the role and timing of alloSCT in MCL. Currently, for selected fit patients with chemotherapy resistant MCL or those who progress after autoSCT, alloSCT may provide long term survival.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)93-102
Number of pages10
JournalStem Cells and Cloning: Advances and Applications
Volume3
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Mantle-Cell Lymphoma
Stem Cell Transplantation
Stem Cells
Transplants
Drug Therapy
Poisons
Cytarabine
Vincristine
Prednisone
Combination Drug Therapy
Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
Doxorubicin
Cyclophosphamide
Disease-Free Survival
Comorbidity
Lymphoma
Recurrence
Survival

Keywords

  • Allogeneic SCT
  • GVL
  • Mantle cell lymphoma
  • Nonmyeloablative

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Tackling mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) : Potential benefit of allogeneic stem cell transplantation. / Shanbhag, Satish P; Smith, Mitchell R.; Emmons, Robert V B.

In: Stem Cells and Cloning: Advances and Applications, Vol. 3, No. 1, 2010, p. 93-102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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