Systems-based Practice in Burn Care: Prevention, Management, and Economic Impact of Health Care–associated Infections

Charles Scott Hultman, David van Duin, Emily Sickbert-Bennett, Lauren M. DiBiase, Samuel W. Jones, Bruce A. Cairns, David J. Weber

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Health care–associated infections in burn patients, from ventilator-associated pneumonia to skin and soft tissue infections, can substantially compromise outcomes, because these complications are associated with longer lengths of stay, increased morbidity and mortality, and greater direct medical costs. Health care–associated infections are largely preventable, through surveillance, education, appropriate hand hygiene, and culture change, especially for device-related infections. Systems-based practice, which allows individuals and clinical microsystems to navigate and improve the macro health care system, may be one of the most powerful skill sets to effect change, permitting a shift in culture toward patient safety and quality improvement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)935-942
Number of pages8
JournalClinics in Plastic Surgery
Volume44
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Burn injury
  • Health care–associated infections
  • Patient safety
  • Quality improvement
  • Systems-based practice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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