Syringe access for the prevention of blood borne infections among injection drug users

Sharon Stancliff, Bruce Agins, Josiah D. Rich, Scott Burris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Approximately one-third of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome cases in the United States are associated with the practice of sharing of injection equipment and are preventable through the once-only use of syringes, needles and other injection equipment.

DISCUSSION: Sterile syringes may be obtained legally by 4 methods depending on the state. They may be purchased over the counter, prescribed, obtained at syringe exchange programs or furnished by authorized agencies. Each of these avenues has advantages and disadvantages; therefore, legal access through all means is the most likely way to promote the use of sterile syringes.

SUMMARY: By assisting illicit drug injectors to obtain sterile syringes the primary care provider is able to reduce the incidence of blood borne infections, and educate patients about safe syringe disposal. The provider is also able to initiate discussion about drug use in a nonjudgmental manner and to offer care to patients who are not yet ready to consider drug treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)37
Number of pages1
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume3
StatePublished - Nov 21 2003
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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  • Cite this

    Stancliff, S., Agins, B., Rich, J. D., & Burris, S. (2003). Syringe access for the prevention of blood borne infections among injection drug users. BMC Public Health, 3, 37.