Synaptic plasticity in neuronal network models can explain patterns of bursting activity seen in temporal lobe epileptic seizures

Pawel Kudela, Piotr J. Franaszczuk, Gregory K. Bergey

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articlepeer-review

Abstract

High-resolution time-frequency analyses of ictal EEG allow for identification and characterization of ictal patterns. These patterns reflect alterations in the brain network synchrony. It is not clear why seizures undergo these dynamical changes and what mechanisms contribute to or cause these changes. In this work we use neural modeling studies to address these issues. We investigate the role of synaptic plasticity and nonsynaptic neuronal plasticity (firing frequency adaptation) in regulating pattern of neuronal network synchrony. We show that nonsynaptic neuronal plasticity (i.e. calcium dependent afterhyperpolarization in neurons) can regulate the frequency of the dominant rhythm in EEG while synaptic potentiation may be responsible for irregular bursting prior to seizure termination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)715-717
Number of pages3
JournalAnnual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings
Volume26 I
StatePublished - Dec 1 2004
EventConference Proceedings - 26th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2004 - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: Sep 1 2004Sep 5 2004

Keywords

  • Afterhyperpolarization
  • Epilepsy
  • Synaptic plasticity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

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