Swallowing dysfunction after cardiac operations: Associated adverse outcomes and risk factors including intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography

Charles W. Hogue, George D. Lappas, Lawrence L. Creswell, T. Bruce Ferguson, Madison Sample, Diane Pugh, Dennis Balfe, James L. Cox, Demetrios G. Lappas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The frequency, importance to patient outcomes, and independent predictors of postoperative swallowing dysfunction documented by barium cineradiography were examined in 869 patients undergoing cardiac operations over a 12-month period. Swallowing dysfunction was diagnosed in 34 patients (4% incidence) and was associated with documented pulmonary aspiration in 90% of these patients, increased frequency of pneumonia (p < 0.0001), need for tracheostomy (p = 0.0002), length of stay in the intensive care unit (p = 0.0001), and duration of hospitalization after the operation (p = 0.0001). Independent predictors of postoperative swallowing dysfunction determined by multivariate logistic regression included age (p < 0.001), length of tracheal intubation after the operation (p = 0.001), and intraoperative use of transesophageal echocardiography (p = 0.003). Dysfunctional swallowing after cardiac operations, a serious complication significantly related to postoperative respiratory morbidity and extended length of hospitalization, is more common in older patients. An association between intraoperative use of transesophageal echocardiography and swallowing dysfunction was also observed in our patients. (J T HORAC CARDIOVASC SURG 1995;110:517-22).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)517-522
Number of pages6
JournalThe Journal of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery
Volume110
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1995

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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