Sustained Increased Consumption of Cigarettes, Alcohol, and Marijuana among Manhattan Residents after September 11, 2001

David Vlahov, Sandro Galea, Jennifer Ahern, Heidi Resnick, Dean Kilpatrick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We compared reports of increased substance use in Manhattan 1 and 6 months after the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. Data from 2 random-digit-dial surveys conducted i and 6 months after September 11 showed that 30.8% and 27.3% of respondents, respectively, reported increased use of cigarettes, alcohol, or marijuana. These sustained increases in substance use following the September 11 terrorist attacks suggest potential long-term health consequences as a result of disasters.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)253-254
Number of pages2
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume94
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 2004
Externally publishedYes

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September 11 Terrorist Attacks
Cannabis
Tobacco Products
Alcohol Drinking
Disasters
Alcohols
Health
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Sustained Increased Consumption of Cigarettes, Alcohol, and Marijuana among Manhattan Residents after September 11, 2001. / Vlahov, David; Galea, Sandro; Ahern, Jennifer; Resnick, Heidi; Kilpatrick, Dean.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 94, No. 2, 02.2004, p. 253-254.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vlahov, David ; Galea, Sandro ; Ahern, Jennifer ; Resnick, Heidi ; Kilpatrick, Dean. / Sustained Increased Consumption of Cigarettes, Alcohol, and Marijuana among Manhattan Residents after September 11, 2001. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2004 ; Vol. 94, No. 2. pp. 253-254.
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