Survivorship care for early-stage colorectal cancer

A national survey of general surgeons and colorectal surgeons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim: Few data are available on the optimal long-term care of early-stage colorectal cancer survivors, termed survivorship care. We aimed to investigate current practice in the management of patients following treatment for early-stage colorectal cancer. Method: We performed an internet survey of members of the American Society for Colon and Rectal Surgeons about several aspects of long-term care, including allocation of clinician responsibility, challenges with transitions to primary care physicians (PCPs), long-term care plan provision and recommended surgical follow-up duration. Results: Overall, 251 surgeons responded. Surgeons reported taking primary responsibility for managing adverse surgical effects (93.2%) and surveillance testing (imaging and laboratories 68.6%, endoscopy 82.4%). Barriers to PCP handoffs included patient preference for surgical follow-up (endorsed by 76.6%) and inadequate communication with PCPs (endorsed by 36.9%). Approximately one-third of surgeons routinely provide survivorship care plans to PCPs; surgeons who received formal survivorship training were more likely to do so compared to those without such training (OR 3.29, 95% CI 1.57, 6.92). Although only 20.4% of surgeons follow their patients beyond 5 years, individuals in practice longer were more likely to continue long-term follow-up than those with ≤ 10 years of experience. Conclusions: This is the largest survey of surgeons regarding long-term management for early-stage colorectal cancer and highlights the potential for improved coordination with PCPs and increased implementation of survivorship care plans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalColorectal Disease
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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Colorectal Neoplasms
Survival Rate
Primary Care Physicians
Long-Term Care
Patient Preference
Practice Management
Surveys and Questionnaires
Surgeons
Internet
Endoscopy
Survivors
Colon
Communication

Keywords

  • Cancer survivorship
  • Colorectal cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

@article{31e719b9b000408991fa8feb962fabe3,
title = "Survivorship care for early-stage colorectal cancer: A national survey of general surgeons and colorectal surgeons",
abstract = "Aim: Few data are available on the optimal long-term care of early-stage colorectal cancer survivors, termed survivorship care. We aimed to investigate current practice in the management of patients following treatment for early-stage colorectal cancer. Method: We performed an internet survey of members of the American Society for Colon and Rectal Surgeons about several aspects of long-term care, including allocation of clinician responsibility, challenges with transitions to primary care physicians (PCPs), long-term care plan provision and recommended surgical follow-up duration. Results: Overall, 251 surgeons responded. Surgeons reported taking primary responsibility for managing adverse surgical effects (93.2{\%}) and surveillance testing (imaging and laboratories 68.6{\%}, endoscopy 82.4{\%}). Barriers to PCP handoffs included patient preference for surgical follow-up (endorsed by 76.6{\%}) and inadequate communication with PCPs (endorsed by 36.9{\%}). Approximately one-third of surgeons routinely provide survivorship care plans to PCPs; surgeons who received formal survivorship training were more likely to do so compared to those without such training (OR 3.29, 95{\%} CI 1.57, 6.92). Although only 20.4{\%} of surgeons follow their patients beyond 5 years, individuals in practice longer were more likely to continue long-term follow-up than those with ≤ 10 years of experience. Conclusions: This is the largest survey of surgeons regarding long-term management for early-stage colorectal cancer and highlights the potential for improved coordination with PCPs and increased implementation of survivorship care plans.",
keywords = "Cancer survivorship, Colorectal cancer",
author = "Youngjee Choi and Huntley, {J. H.} and Jonathan Efron and K. Sato and Michael Marohn and Craig Pollack",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/codi.14321",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Colorectal Disease",
issn = "1462-8910",
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T1 - Survivorship care for early-stage colorectal cancer

T2 - A national survey of general surgeons and colorectal surgeons

AU - Choi, Youngjee

AU - Huntley, J. H.

AU - Efron, Jonathan

AU - Sato, K.

AU - Marohn, Michael

AU - Pollack, Craig

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Aim: Few data are available on the optimal long-term care of early-stage colorectal cancer survivors, termed survivorship care. We aimed to investigate current practice in the management of patients following treatment for early-stage colorectal cancer. Method: We performed an internet survey of members of the American Society for Colon and Rectal Surgeons about several aspects of long-term care, including allocation of clinician responsibility, challenges with transitions to primary care physicians (PCPs), long-term care plan provision and recommended surgical follow-up duration. Results: Overall, 251 surgeons responded. Surgeons reported taking primary responsibility for managing adverse surgical effects (93.2%) and surveillance testing (imaging and laboratories 68.6%, endoscopy 82.4%). Barriers to PCP handoffs included patient preference for surgical follow-up (endorsed by 76.6%) and inadequate communication with PCPs (endorsed by 36.9%). Approximately one-third of surgeons routinely provide survivorship care plans to PCPs; surgeons who received formal survivorship training were more likely to do so compared to those without such training (OR 3.29, 95% CI 1.57, 6.92). Although only 20.4% of surgeons follow their patients beyond 5 years, individuals in practice longer were more likely to continue long-term follow-up than those with ≤ 10 years of experience. Conclusions: This is the largest survey of surgeons regarding long-term management for early-stage colorectal cancer and highlights the potential for improved coordination with PCPs and increased implementation of survivorship care plans.

AB - Aim: Few data are available on the optimal long-term care of early-stage colorectal cancer survivors, termed survivorship care. We aimed to investigate current practice in the management of patients following treatment for early-stage colorectal cancer. Method: We performed an internet survey of members of the American Society for Colon and Rectal Surgeons about several aspects of long-term care, including allocation of clinician responsibility, challenges with transitions to primary care physicians (PCPs), long-term care plan provision and recommended surgical follow-up duration. Results: Overall, 251 surgeons responded. Surgeons reported taking primary responsibility for managing adverse surgical effects (93.2%) and surveillance testing (imaging and laboratories 68.6%, endoscopy 82.4%). Barriers to PCP handoffs included patient preference for surgical follow-up (endorsed by 76.6%) and inadequate communication with PCPs (endorsed by 36.9%). Approximately one-third of surgeons routinely provide survivorship care plans to PCPs; surgeons who received formal survivorship training were more likely to do so compared to those without such training (OR 3.29, 95% CI 1.57, 6.92). Although only 20.4% of surgeons follow their patients beyond 5 years, individuals in practice longer were more likely to continue long-term follow-up than those with ≤ 10 years of experience. Conclusions: This is the largest survey of surgeons regarding long-term management for early-stage colorectal cancer and highlights the potential for improved coordination with PCPs and increased implementation of survivorship care plans.

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KW - Colorectal cancer

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