Survey of reproductive health among female MR workers

Emanuel Kanal, Joseph S Gillen, Josephine A. Evans, David A. Savitz, Frank G. Shellock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Epidemiologic data were obtained to evaluate potential risks from exposure to the static and time-varying magnetic fields used in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. A questionnaire sent to women workers in more than 90% of clinical MR facilities in the United States addressed menstrual-reproductive experiences, work activities, and potential confounders (eg, age, smoking, alcohol use). In 1,915 completed questionnaires, 1,421 pregnancies were reported: 280 occurred in an MR worker (technologist or nurse), 894 in an employee in another job, 54 in a student, and 193 in homemakers. Comparing MR-worker pregnancies with those occurring in employees at other jobs, a relative risk ratio of 1.27 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.92-1.77) was found for spontaneous abortions; for conception taking more than 12 months, 0.90 (CI, 0.54-1.51); for delivery before 39 weeks, 1.19 (CI, 0.76-1.88); for birth weight below 5.5 lb (25 kg), 1.01 (CI, 0.50-2.04); and for male gender of the offspring, 0.99 (CI, 0.80-1.22). Adjustment for maternal age, smoking, and alcohol use also failed to markedly change any of the associations. These results suggest that there is not a substantial increase in these common adverse reproductive outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)395-399
Number of pages5
JournalRadiology
Volume187
Issue number2
StatePublished - May 1993
Externally publishedYes

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Reproductive Health
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Confidence Intervals
Smoking
Alcohols
Pregnancy
Maternal Age
Spontaneous Abortion
Magnetic Fields
Birth Weight
Odds Ratio
Nurses
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Surveys and Questionnaires
Students

Keywords

  • Magnetic resonance (MR), biological effects

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Kanal, E., Gillen, J. S., Evans, J. A., Savitz, D. A., & Shellock, F. G. (1993). Survey of reproductive health among female MR workers. Radiology, 187(2), 395-399.

Survey of reproductive health among female MR workers. / Kanal, Emanuel; Gillen, Joseph S; Evans, Josephine A.; Savitz, David A.; Shellock, Frank G.

In: Radiology, Vol. 187, No. 2, 05.1993, p. 395-399.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kanal, E, Gillen, JS, Evans, JA, Savitz, DA & Shellock, FG 1993, 'Survey of reproductive health among female MR workers', Radiology, vol. 187, no. 2, pp. 395-399.
Kanal E, Gillen JS, Evans JA, Savitz DA, Shellock FG. Survey of reproductive health among female MR workers. Radiology. 1993 May;187(2):395-399.
Kanal, Emanuel ; Gillen, Joseph S ; Evans, Josephine A. ; Savitz, David A. ; Shellock, Frank G. / Survey of reproductive health among female MR workers. In: Radiology. 1993 ; Vol. 187, No. 2. pp. 395-399.
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