Survey of Impediments to Prevention of Mother-To-Infant Transmission of Hepatitis B Virus by International Societies

Mei Hwei Chang, Bjorn Fischler, Barri Blauvelt, Mirta Ciocca, Anil Dhawan, Udeme Ekong, Yen Hsuan Ni, Gilda Porta, Anupam Sibal, Daniel Dagostino, Stefan Wirth, Neelam Morhan, Kathleen Schwarz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Mother-to-infant transmission (MIT) is the leading cause of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections globally. The aim of this international study was to assess the impediments to prevention of (MIT) of HBV. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was developed by the Federation of the International Societies for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. (FISPGHAN) The survey was sent to HBV experts of the five member societies of FISPGHAN, and 63/91 countries/regions responded. Main outcome measures include percentage of countries having vaccine programs, timing of the first dose of HBV vaccine, availability of HBV vaccine for out-born neonates, payment of HBV vaccine and HBIG, screening HBV markers during pregnancy, and antivirals to highly infectious pregnant mothers. Results: Among the participating countries/regions, 11% did not implement infant HBV immunization programs. The first dose of vaccine was given >24 hours in 36% of the total countries and 100% of African countries. The recommended birth dose was unavailable for out-born neonates in 45% of the total countries, including 92% of African and 50% of Latin American countries/regions. During pregnancy, 44% countries do not screen maternal viral markers, and 46% do not provide third trimester antiviral therapy for highly viremic pregnant mothers. Conclusions: Our study demonstrated multiple obstacles to achieving the goal of preventing MIT of HBV. Comprehensive public health programs to enhance vaccine coverage rate, supply HBV vaccine for out-born neonates, screening maternal HBV markers, treating highly viremic pregnant mothers are proposed to overcome these obstacles and achieve the goal of preventing MIT of HBV.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Hepatitis B virus
Mothers
Hepatitis B Vaccines
Vaccines
Newborn Infant
Gastroenterology
Antiviral Agents
Surveys and Questionnaires
Pregnancy
Immunization Programs
Third Pregnancy Trimester
Virus Diseases
Public Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Biomarkers
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Parturition
Pediatrics

Keywords

  • immunization
  • international health
  • liver disease
  • viral hepatitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Survey of Impediments to Prevention of Mother-To-Infant Transmission of Hepatitis B Virus by International Societies. / Chang, Mei Hwei; Fischler, Bjorn; Blauvelt, Barri; Ciocca, Mirta; Dhawan, Anil; Ekong, Udeme; Ni, Yen Hsuan; Porta, Gilda; Sibal, Anupam; Dagostino, Daniel; Wirth, Stefan; Morhan, Neelam; Schwarz, Kathleen.

In: Journal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chang, Mei Hwei ; Fischler, Bjorn ; Blauvelt, Barri ; Ciocca, Mirta ; Dhawan, Anil ; Ekong, Udeme ; Ni, Yen Hsuan ; Porta, Gilda ; Sibal, Anupam ; Dagostino, Daniel ; Wirth, Stefan ; Morhan, Neelam ; Schwarz, Kathleen. / Survey of Impediments to Prevention of Mother-To-Infant Transmission of Hepatitis B Virus by International Societies. In: Journal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition. 2019.
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abstract = "Mother-to-infant transmission (MIT) is the leading cause of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections globally. The aim of this international study was to assess the impediments to prevention of (MIT) of HBV. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was developed by the Federation of the International Societies for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. (FISPGHAN) The survey was sent to HBV experts of the five member societies of FISPGHAN, and 63/91 countries/regions responded. Main outcome measures include percentage of countries having vaccine programs, timing of the first dose of HBV vaccine, availability of HBV vaccine for out-born neonates, payment of HBV vaccine and HBIG, screening HBV markers during pregnancy, and antivirals to highly infectious pregnant mothers. Results: Among the participating countries/regions, 11{\%} did not implement infant HBV immunization programs. The first dose of vaccine was given >24 hours in 36{\%} of the total countries and 100{\%} of African countries. The recommended birth dose was unavailable for out-born neonates in 45{\%} of the total countries, including 92{\%} of African and 50{\%} of Latin American countries/regions. During pregnancy, 44{\%} countries do not screen maternal viral markers, and 46{\%} do not provide third trimester antiviral therapy for highly viremic pregnant mothers. Conclusions: Our study demonstrated multiple obstacles to achieving the goal of preventing MIT of HBV. Comprehensive public health programs to enhance vaccine coverage rate, supply HBV vaccine for out-born neonates, screening maternal HBV markers, treating highly viremic pregnant mothers are proposed to overcome these obstacles and achieve the goal of preventing MIT of HBV.",
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AU - Chang, Mei Hwei

AU - Fischler, Bjorn

AU - Blauvelt, Barri

AU - Ciocca, Mirta

AU - Dhawan, Anil

AU - Ekong, Udeme

AU - Ni, Yen Hsuan

AU - Porta, Gilda

AU - Sibal, Anupam

AU - Dagostino, Daniel

AU - Wirth, Stefan

AU - Morhan, Neelam

AU - Schwarz, Kathleen

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AB - Mother-to-infant transmission (MIT) is the leading cause of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections globally. The aim of this international study was to assess the impediments to prevention of (MIT) of HBV. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was developed by the Federation of the International Societies for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. (FISPGHAN) The survey was sent to HBV experts of the five member societies of FISPGHAN, and 63/91 countries/regions responded. Main outcome measures include percentage of countries having vaccine programs, timing of the first dose of HBV vaccine, availability of HBV vaccine for out-born neonates, payment of HBV vaccine and HBIG, screening HBV markers during pregnancy, and antivirals to highly infectious pregnant mothers. Results: Among the participating countries/regions, 11% did not implement infant HBV immunization programs. The first dose of vaccine was given >24 hours in 36% of the total countries and 100% of African countries. The recommended birth dose was unavailable for out-born neonates in 45% of the total countries, including 92% of African and 50% of Latin American countries/regions. During pregnancy, 44% countries do not screen maternal viral markers, and 46% do not provide third trimester antiviral therapy for highly viremic pregnant mothers. Conclusions: Our study demonstrated multiple obstacles to achieving the goal of preventing MIT of HBV. Comprehensive public health programs to enhance vaccine coverage rate, supply HBV vaccine for out-born neonates, screening maternal HBV markers, treating highly viremic pregnant mothers are proposed to overcome these obstacles and achieve the goal of preventing MIT of HBV.

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