Surgical Experience With Pancreatic Islet-Cell Tumors

Charles J. Yeo, Bernadette H. Wang, Gary J. Anthone, John L Cameron

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To review the surgical management of pancreatic islet-cell tumors, with attention to preoperative localization, surgical therapy, and postoperative survival. Design: Consecutive case series of patients treated surgically for pancreatic islet-cell tumor. Setting: The Johns Hopkins Hospital, a large teaching hospital in Baltimore, Md, serving both as a primary and tertiary care center. Patients: Thirty-seven patients with pancreatic islet-cell tumors treated surgically between 1979 and 1990. Main Outcome Measures: Success of preoperative localization studies, types of operations performed, and postoperative survival. Results: Preoperative computed tomography correctly localized the tumor in 20 of 34 patients (59%); angiography in 21 of 28 patients (75%), and the combination of computed tomography and angiography in 23 of 28 patients (82%). Benign islet-cell tumors were found in 19 patients, and malignant tumors in 18 patients. Twenty-four patients (65%) had functional tumors. The proportion of patients with nonfunctioning tumors increased from 0% before 1984, to 43% from 1985 to 1990. Surgical therapy was curative in 27 patients and palliative in 10. The most commonly performed operative procedures were tumor enucleation (11 patients [30%]), distal pancreatectomy (10 patients [27%] and pancreaticoduodenectomy (10 patients [27%]). There was no operative mortality. The actuarial survival at 40 months was 100% in patients with benign tumors and significantly lower (66%) in patients with malignant tumors. Conclusions: This experience from a single institution underscores the role of preoperative localization studies and appropriate surgical management of these rare tumors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1143-1148
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Surgery
Volume128
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993

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Neoplasms
Pancreatic islet cell tumors
Survival
Islet Cell Adenoma
Baltimore
Pancreatectomy
Pancreaticoduodenectomy
Operative Surgical Procedures
Tertiary Care Centers
Teaching Hospitals
Primary Health Care
Angiography
Tomography
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Mortality
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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Surgical Experience With Pancreatic Islet-Cell Tumors. / Yeo, Charles J.; Wang, Bernadette H.; Anthone, Gary J.; Cameron, John L.

In: Archives of Surgery, Vol. 128, No. 10, 1993, p. 1143-1148.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yeo, Charles J. ; Wang, Bernadette H. ; Anthone, Gary J. ; Cameron, John L. / Surgical Experience With Pancreatic Islet-Cell Tumors. In: Archives of Surgery. 1993 ; Vol. 128, No. 10. pp. 1143-1148.
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