Surgery for postvitrectomy cataract

Diana V. Do, Stephen Gichuhi, Satyanarayana S. Vedula, Barbara S Hawkins

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Background: Cataract formation or acceleration can occur after intraocular surgery, especially following vitrectomy, a surgical technique for removing the vitreous that is used in the treatment of many disorders that affect the posterior segment of the eye. The underlying problem that led to vitrectomy may limit the benefit from removal of the cataractous lens. Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of surgery versus no surgery for postvitrectomy cataract with respect to visual acuity, quality of life, and other outcomes. Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Trials Register) (2017, Issue 5), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 17 May 2017), Embase.com (1947 to 17 May 2017), PubMed (1946 to 17 May 2017), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature database (LILACS) (January 1982 to 17 May 2017), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com); last searched May 2013, ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov); searched 17 May 2017, and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en); searched 17 May 2017. We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. Selection criteria: We planned to include randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs that had compared surgery versus no surgery to remove the lens from eyes of adults in which cataracts had developed following vitrectomy. Data collection and analysis: Two review authors independently screened the search results according to the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Main results: We found no RCTs or quasi-RCTs that had compared surgery versus no surgery to remove the lens from eyes of adults in which cataracts had developed following vitrectomy. Authors' conclusions: There is no evidence from RCTs or quasi-RCTs on which to base clinical recommendations for surgery for postvitrectomy cataract. There is a clear need for RCTs to address this evidence gap. Such trials should stratify participants by their age, the retinal disorder leading to vitrectomy, and the status of the underlying disease process in the contralateral eye. Outcomes assessed in such trials may include changes (both gains and losses) of visual acuity, quality of life, and adverse events such as posterior capsular rupture and retinal detachment. Both short-term (six-month) and long-term (one- or two-year) outcomes should be examined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberCD006366
JournalCochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Volume2018
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 10 2018

Fingerprint

Cataract
Vitrectomy
Randomized Controlled Trials
Crystalline Lens
Visual Acuity
Posterior Eye Segment
Quality of Life
Retinal Detachment
PubMed
MEDLINE
Patient Selection
Lenses
Registries
Rupture
Language
Clinical Trials
Databases
Safety
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Surgery for postvitrectomy cataract. / Do, Diana V.; Gichuhi, Stephen; Vedula, Satyanarayana S.; Hawkins, Barbara S.

In: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Vol. 2018, No. 1, CD006366, 10.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Do, Diana V. ; Gichuhi, Stephen ; Vedula, Satyanarayana S. ; Hawkins, Barbara S. / Surgery for postvitrectomy cataract. In: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. 2018 ; Vol. 2018, No. 1.
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