Surgery After an Initial Episode of Uncomplicated Diverticulitis: Does Time to Resection Matter?

Sanskriti Varma, Ambar Mehta, Joseph K. Canner, Faris Azar, David Thomas Efron, Jonathan Efron, Bashar Safar, Joseph Sakran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The aim of this study was to determine whether time to surgery after an initial episode of uncomplicated diverticulitis is associated with undergoing an emergent versus an elective resection. Methods: In this retrospective, administrative claims database study, we identified patients at least 18 y old in the 2005-2011 California State Inpatient Database who had an initial episode of uncomplicated diverticulitis and then underwent a bowel resection within 2 y. After characterizing the distribution in time to surgery among all patients, we used a multivariable logistic regression to determine whether time to surgery was associated with undergoing an emergent resection. Next, we assessed differences in three outcomes between elective and emergent resections: at least one of eight postoperative complications, extended length of stay (defined as the top decile of hospitalizations), and 30-d inpatient readmissions. Analyses adjusted for time between initial hospitalization and resection, number of inpatient hospitalizations for diverticulitis before the resection, clinical factors, and hospital clustering. Results: We identified 4478 patients with an initial episode of uncomplicated diverticulitis followed by a bowel resection within the subsequent 2 y. One-fifth (21.1%) underwent an emergent resection. The median time from the initial episode to resection was 3.8 mo (IQR: 2.3-8.1 mo) for elective resections and 5.1 mo (IQR: 2.3-12.4 mo) for emergent resections. The adjusted odds of undergoing an emergent relative to an elective resection increased by 7% (aOR 1.07 [1.02-1.11]) for every 3 passing mo. Emergent resections were associated with greater adjusted odds of complications (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.75 [95%-CI 1.43-2.15]), extended LOS (aOR 4.52 [3.31-6.17]), and 30-d readmissions (aOR 1.49 [1.09-2.04]). Conclusions: Among patients who experienced an initial episode of uncomplicated diverticulitis and eventually underwent a resection, the odds of having an emergent relative to elective surgery increased with every 3 passing mo. These findings may inform the management of uncomplicated diverticulitis for high-risk patients eventually needing surgery.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages224-230
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume234
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2019

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Diverticulitis
Odds Ratio
Inpatients
Hospitalization
Databases
Cluster Analysis
Length of Stay
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • 30-Day readmissions
  • Complications
  • Diverticulitis
  • Emergent resections
  • Length of stay
  • Time to surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Surgery After an Initial Episode of Uncomplicated Diverticulitis : Does Time to Resection Matter? / Varma, Sanskriti; Mehta, Ambar; Canner, Joseph K.; Azar, Faris; Efron, David Thomas; Efron, Jonathan; Safar, Bashar; Sakran, Joseph.

In: Journal of Surgical Research, Vol. 234, 01.02.2019, p. 224-230.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: The aim of this study was to determine whether time to surgery after an initial episode of uncomplicated diverticulitis is associated with undergoing an emergent versus an elective resection. Methods: In this retrospective, administrative claims database study, we identified patients at least 18 y old in the 2005-2011 California State Inpatient Database who had an initial episode of uncomplicated diverticulitis and then underwent a bowel resection within 2 y. After characterizing the distribution in time to surgery among all patients, we used a multivariable logistic regression to determine whether time to surgery was associated with undergoing an emergent resection. Next, we assessed differences in three outcomes between elective and emergent resections: at least one of eight postoperative complications, extended length of stay (defined as the top decile of hospitalizations), and 30-d inpatient readmissions. Analyses adjusted for time between initial hospitalization and resection, number of inpatient hospitalizations for diverticulitis before the resection, clinical factors, and hospital clustering. Results: We identified 4478 patients with an initial episode of uncomplicated diverticulitis followed by a bowel resection within the subsequent 2 y. One-fifth (21.1{\%}) underwent an emergent resection. The median time from the initial episode to resection was 3.8 mo (IQR: 2.3-8.1 mo) for elective resections and 5.1 mo (IQR: 2.3-12.4 mo) for emergent resections. The adjusted odds of undergoing an emergent relative to an elective resection increased by 7{\%} (aOR 1.07 [1.02-1.11]) for every 3 passing mo. Emergent resections were associated with greater adjusted odds of complications (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.75 [95{\%}-CI 1.43-2.15]), extended LOS (aOR 4.52 [3.31-6.17]), and 30-d readmissions (aOR 1.49 [1.09-2.04]). Conclusions: Among patients who experienced an initial episode of uncomplicated diverticulitis and eventually underwent a resection, the odds of having an emergent relative to elective surgery increased with every 3 passing mo. These findings may inform the management of uncomplicated diverticulitis for high-risk patients eventually needing surgery.",
keywords = "30-Day readmissions, Complications, Diverticulitis, Emergent resections, Length of stay, Time to surgery",
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AU - Varma, Sanskriti

AU - Mehta, Ambar

AU - Canner, Joseph K.

AU - Azar, Faris

AU - Efron, David Thomas

AU - Efron, Jonathan

AU - Safar, Bashar

AU - Sakran, Joseph

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N2 - Background: The aim of this study was to determine whether time to surgery after an initial episode of uncomplicated diverticulitis is associated with undergoing an emergent versus an elective resection. Methods: In this retrospective, administrative claims database study, we identified patients at least 18 y old in the 2005-2011 California State Inpatient Database who had an initial episode of uncomplicated diverticulitis and then underwent a bowel resection within 2 y. After characterizing the distribution in time to surgery among all patients, we used a multivariable logistic regression to determine whether time to surgery was associated with undergoing an emergent resection. Next, we assessed differences in three outcomes between elective and emergent resections: at least one of eight postoperative complications, extended length of stay (defined as the top decile of hospitalizations), and 30-d inpatient readmissions. Analyses adjusted for time between initial hospitalization and resection, number of inpatient hospitalizations for diverticulitis before the resection, clinical factors, and hospital clustering. Results: We identified 4478 patients with an initial episode of uncomplicated diverticulitis followed by a bowel resection within the subsequent 2 y. One-fifth (21.1%) underwent an emergent resection. The median time from the initial episode to resection was 3.8 mo (IQR: 2.3-8.1 mo) for elective resections and 5.1 mo (IQR: 2.3-12.4 mo) for emergent resections. The adjusted odds of undergoing an emergent relative to an elective resection increased by 7% (aOR 1.07 [1.02-1.11]) for every 3 passing mo. Emergent resections were associated with greater adjusted odds of complications (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.75 [95%-CI 1.43-2.15]), extended LOS (aOR 4.52 [3.31-6.17]), and 30-d readmissions (aOR 1.49 [1.09-2.04]). Conclusions: Among patients who experienced an initial episode of uncomplicated diverticulitis and eventually underwent a resection, the odds of having an emergent relative to elective surgery increased with every 3 passing mo. These findings may inform the management of uncomplicated diverticulitis for high-risk patients eventually needing surgery.

AB - Background: The aim of this study was to determine whether time to surgery after an initial episode of uncomplicated diverticulitis is associated with undergoing an emergent versus an elective resection. Methods: In this retrospective, administrative claims database study, we identified patients at least 18 y old in the 2005-2011 California State Inpatient Database who had an initial episode of uncomplicated diverticulitis and then underwent a bowel resection within 2 y. After characterizing the distribution in time to surgery among all patients, we used a multivariable logistic regression to determine whether time to surgery was associated with undergoing an emergent resection. Next, we assessed differences in three outcomes between elective and emergent resections: at least one of eight postoperative complications, extended length of stay (defined as the top decile of hospitalizations), and 30-d inpatient readmissions. Analyses adjusted for time between initial hospitalization and resection, number of inpatient hospitalizations for diverticulitis before the resection, clinical factors, and hospital clustering. Results: We identified 4478 patients with an initial episode of uncomplicated diverticulitis followed by a bowel resection within the subsequent 2 y. One-fifth (21.1%) underwent an emergent resection. The median time from the initial episode to resection was 3.8 mo (IQR: 2.3-8.1 mo) for elective resections and 5.1 mo (IQR: 2.3-12.4 mo) for emergent resections. The adjusted odds of undergoing an emergent relative to an elective resection increased by 7% (aOR 1.07 [1.02-1.11]) for every 3 passing mo. Emergent resections were associated with greater adjusted odds of complications (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.75 [95%-CI 1.43-2.15]), extended LOS (aOR 4.52 [3.31-6.17]), and 30-d readmissions (aOR 1.49 [1.09-2.04]). Conclusions: Among patients who experienced an initial episode of uncomplicated diverticulitis and eventually underwent a resection, the odds of having an emergent relative to elective surgery increased with every 3 passing mo. These findings may inform the management of uncomplicated diverticulitis for high-risk patients eventually needing surgery.

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