Surgeons' perceptions on industry relations: A survey of 822 surgeons

Maria S. Altieri, Jie Yang, Lily Wang, Donglei Yin, Mark Talamini, Aurora D. Pryor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The relationships between industry and medical professionals are controversial. The purpose of our study was to evaluate surgeons' current opinions regarding the industry-surgery partnership, in addition to self-reported industry ties. Methods: After institutional review board approval, a survey was sent via RedCap to 3,782 surgeons across the United States. Univariate and multivariable regression analyses were performed to evaluate the responses. Results: The response rate was 23%. From the 822 responders, 226 (27%) reported at least one current relationship with industry, while 297 (36.1%) had at least one such relationship within the past 3 years. There was no difference between general surgery versus other surgical specialties (P = .5). Among the general surgery subspecialties, respondents in minimally invasive surgery/foregut had greater ties to industry compared to other subspecialties (P = .001). In addition, midcareer surgeons, male sex, and being on a reviewer/editorial board were associated with having industry ties (P < .05). Most surgeons (71%) believed that the relationships with industry are important for innovation. Conclusion: Our study showed that relationships between surgeons and industry are common, because more than a quarter of our responders reported at least one current relationship. Industry relations are perceived as necessary for operative innovation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalSurgery (United States)
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2017

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Industry
Surgical Specialties
Surveys and Questionnaires
Surgeons
Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures
Research Ethics Committees
Regression Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Altieri, M. S., Yang, J., Wang, L., Yin, D., Talamini, M., & Pryor, A. D. (Accepted/In press). Surgeons' perceptions on industry relations: A survey of 822 surgeons. Surgery (United States). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.surg.2017.01.010

Surgeons' perceptions on industry relations : A survey of 822 surgeons. / Altieri, Maria S.; Yang, Jie; Wang, Lily; Yin, Donglei; Talamini, Mark; Pryor, Aurora D.

In: Surgery (United States), 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Altieri, Maria S. ; Yang, Jie ; Wang, Lily ; Yin, Donglei ; Talamini, Mark ; Pryor, Aurora D. / Surgeons' perceptions on industry relations : A survey of 822 surgeons. In: Surgery (United States). 2017.
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