Supporting irrational suicide

V. Gray Hardcastle, Rosalyn Stewart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In this essay, we present three case studies which suggest that sometimes we are better off supporting a so-called irrational suicide, and that emotional or psychological distress - even if medically controllable - might justify a suicide. We underscore how complicated these decisions are and how murky a physician's moral role can be. We advocate a more individualized route to end-of-life care, eschewing well-meaning, principled, generalizations in favor of a highly contextualized, patient-centered, approach. We conclude that our Western traditions of promoting reasoned behavior and life themselves may at times be counter-productive.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)425-438
Number of pages14
JournalBioethics
Volume16
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Suicide
suicide
Physician's Role
Terminal Care
physician
Psychology
Physicians
Western Tradition
Emotion
Route
Psychological Distress
End of Life Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Gray Hardcastle, V., & Stewart, R. (2002). Supporting irrational suicide. Bioethics, 16(5), 425-438.

Supporting irrational suicide. / Gray Hardcastle, V.; Stewart, Rosalyn.

In: Bioethics, Vol. 16, No. 5, 09.2002, p. 425-438.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gray Hardcastle, V & Stewart, R 2002, 'Supporting irrational suicide', Bioethics, vol. 16, no. 5, pp. 425-438.
Gray Hardcastle V, Stewart R. Supporting irrational suicide. Bioethics. 2002 Sep;16(5):425-438.
Gray Hardcastle, V. ; Stewart, Rosalyn. / Supporting irrational suicide. In: Bioethics. 2002 ; Vol. 16, No. 5. pp. 425-438.
@article{11adf39fc6f8481e89020458aad7b2dc,
title = "Supporting irrational suicide",
abstract = "In this essay, we present three case studies which suggest that sometimes we are better off supporting a so-called irrational suicide, and that emotional or psychological distress - even if medically controllable - might justify a suicide. We underscore how complicated these decisions are and how murky a physician's moral role can be. We advocate a more individualized route to end-of-life care, eschewing well-meaning, principled, generalizations in favor of a highly contextualized, patient-centered, approach. We conclude that our Western traditions of promoting reasoned behavior and life themselves may at times be counter-productive.",
author = "{Gray Hardcastle}, V. and Rosalyn Stewart",
year = "2002",
month = "9",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "16",
pages = "425--438",
journal = "Bioethics",
issn = "0269-9702",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Supporting irrational suicide

AU - Gray Hardcastle, V.

AU - Stewart, Rosalyn

PY - 2002/9

Y1 - 2002/9

N2 - In this essay, we present three case studies which suggest that sometimes we are better off supporting a so-called irrational suicide, and that emotional or psychological distress - even if medically controllable - might justify a suicide. We underscore how complicated these decisions are and how murky a physician's moral role can be. We advocate a more individualized route to end-of-life care, eschewing well-meaning, principled, generalizations in favor of a highly contextualized, patient-centered, approach. We conclude that our Western traditions of promoting reasoned behavior and life themselves may at times be counter-productive.

AB - In this essay, we present three case studies which suggest that sometimes we are better off supporting a so-called irrational suicide, and that emotional or psychological distress - even if medically controllable - might justify a suicide. We underscore how complicated these decisions are and how murky a physician's moral role can be. We advocate a more individualized route to end-of-life care, eschewing well-meaning, principled, generalizations in favor of a highly contextualized, patient-centered, approach. We conclude that our Western traditions of promoting reasoned behavior and life themselves may at times be counter-productive.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036707604&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036707604&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 12472090

AN - SCOPUS:0036707604

VL - 16

SP - 425

EP - 438

JO - Bioethics

JF - Bioethics

SN - 0269-9702

IS - 5

ER -