Support of the family and staff

Renee Boss, Carl Waldman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Introduction A critical illness in a pregnant woman is often a crisis for her entire family – the woman herself, her fetus, her partner, other children, and extended family and loved ones. The family burden becomes even greater if the infant is delivered and requires intensive care while the mother remains critically ill. In addition to stabilizing and treating the patient’s acute medical problems, interdisciplinary clinicians must also anticipate and address the family’s needs; this optimizes their ability to be fully engaged in supporting the patient, supporting each other, and acting as surrogate decision makers. While individual families have unique challenges and needs, a number of resources from clinicians and the healthcare system can benefit most families. Critical care staff caring for the patient and her fetus or newborn also benefit from systematic supports, as they are repeatedly exposed to patient trauma, family crisis, and loss. Failure to routinely address staff moral and emotional distress can result in compassion fatigue and burnout.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMaternal Critical Care: A Multidisciplinary Approach
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages71-77
Number of pages7
ISBN (Print)9781139088084, 9781107018495
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

Fingerprint

Critical Care
Critical Illness
Fetus
Aptitude
Pregnant Women
Mothers
Newborn Infant
Delivery of Health Care
Wounds and Injuries
Compassion Fatigue

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Boss, R., & Waldman, C. (2011). Support of the family and staff. In Maternal Critical Care: A Multidisciplinary Approach (pp. 71-77). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139088084.008

Support of the family and staff. / Boss, Renee; Waldman, Carl.

Maternal Critical Care: A Multidisciplinary Approach. Cambridge University Press, 2011. p. 71-77.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Boss, R & Waldman, C 2011, Support of the family and staff. in Maternal Critical Care: A Multidisciplinary Approach. Cambridge University Press, pp. 71-77. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139088084.008
Boss R, Waldman C. Support of the family and staff. In Maternal Critical Care: A Multidisciplinary Approach. Cambridge University Press. 2011. p. 71-77 https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139088084.008
Boss, Renee ; Waldman, Carl. / Support of the family and staff. Maternal Critical Care: A Multidisciplinary Approach. Cambridge University Press, 2011. pp. 71-77
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