Superficial Peroneal Nerve (Superficial Fibularis Nerve): The Clinical Implications of Anatomic Variability

Stephen L. Barrett, A. Lee Dellon, Gedge David Rosson, Linda Walters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to refine further the knowledge about the anatomic variability of the superficial peroneal nerve in the middle third of the leg. Approaching the superficial peroneal nerve in this location is required: 1) when either the deep or the superficial peroneal nerve must be resected for the treatment of dorsal foot pain; 2) when a neurolysis of the superficial peroneal nerve is required; 3) when a fasciotomy must be performed either for trauma or for exertional compartment syndrome surgery; and 4) during elevation of a fasciocutaneous or fibular flaps. Because of the variability encountered during these procedures, a prospective study was carried out via lower extremity cadaver dissection with fresh, frozen specimens. A total of 35 nonpaired lower extremities and 40 paired lower extremities were dissected with 3.5 loupe magnification. The superficial peroneal nerve was identified in the lateral compartment immediately adjacent to the fascial septum in 72% of the specimens (54 of 75), with a branch in both the anterior and the lateral compartment in 5% of the specimens (4 of 75), and located in the anterior compartment in only 23% of the specimens (17 of 75). The clinical implications of these anatomic findings are that the surgeon operating in the anterior and lateral compartments of the leg should be aware that the superficial peroneal nerve may be located in the lateral compartment and may also exhibit branches in both the anterior and lateral compartments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)174-176
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Foot and Ankle Surgery
Volume45
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Peroneal Nerve
Lower Extremity
Leg
Compartment Syndromes
Cadaver
Dissection
Foot
Prospective Studies
Pain
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • compartment syndrome
  • nerve compression
  • peroneal nerve
  • superficial fibularis nerve

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Superficial Peroneal Nerve (Superficial Fibularis Nerve) : The Clinical Implications of Anatomic Variability. / Barrett, Stephen L.; Dellon, A. Lee; Rosson, Gedge David; Walters, Linda.

In: Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery, Vol. 45, No. 3, 05.2006, p. 174-176.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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