Sulforaphane treatment of autism spectrum disorder (ASD)

Kanwaljit Singh, Susan L. Connors, Eric A. Macklin, Kirby D. Smith, Jed W Fahey, Paul Talalay, Andrew W. Zimmerman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD), characterized by both impaired communication and social interaction, and by stereotypic behavior, affects about 1 in 68, predominantly males. The medico-economic burdens of ASD are enormous, and no recognized treatment targets the core features of ASD. In a placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized trial, young men (aged 13-27) with moderate to severe ASD received the phytochemical sulforaphane (n = 29) - derived from broccoli sprout extracts - or indistinguishable placebo (n = 15). The effects on behavior of daily oral doses of sulforaphane (50-150 μmol) for 18 wk, followed by 4 wk without treatment, were quantified by three widely accepted behavioral measures completed by parents/caregivers and physicians: the Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC), Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS), and Clinical Global Impression Improvement Scale (CGI-I). Initial scores for ABC and SRS were closely matched for participants assigned to placebo and sulforaphane. After 18 wk, participants receiving placebo experienced minimal change (

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)15550-15555
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume111
Issue number43
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 28 2014

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Placebos
Checklist
Brassica
Phytochemicals
Therapeutics
Interpersonal Relations
Caregivers
Parents
Communication
Economics
Physicians
Autism Spectrum Disorder
sulforafan

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General
  • Medicine(all)

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Sulforaphane treatment of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). / Singh, Kanwaljit; Connors, Susan L.; Macklin, Eric A.; Smith, Kirby D.; Fahey, Jed W; Talalay, Paul; Zimmerman, Andrew W.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 111, No. 43, 28.10.2014, p. 15550-15555.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Singh, Kanwaljit ; Connors, Susan L. ; Macklin, Eric A. ; Smith, Kirby D. ; Fahey, Jed W ; Talalay, Paul ; Zimmerman, Andrew W. / Sulforaphane treatment of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2014 ; Vol. 111, No. 43. pp. 15550-15555.
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