Sugar-sweetened carbonated beverage consumption and coronary artery calcification in asymptomatic men and women

Sohyun Chun, Yuni Choi, Yoosoo Chang, Juhee Cho, Yiyi Zhang, Sanjay Rampal, Di Zhao, Jiin Ahn, Byung Seong Suh, Roberto Pastor-Barriuso, Joao A.C. Lima, Eun Chul Chung, Hocheol Shin, Eliseo Guallar, Seungho Ryu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background Sugar-sweetened carbonated beverage consumption has been linked to obesity, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and clinically manifest coronary heart disease, but its association with subclinical coronary heart disease remains unclear. We investigated the relationship between sugar-sweetened carbonated beverage consumption and coronary artery calcium (CAC) in a large study of asymptomatic men and women. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of 22,210 adult men and women who underwent a comprehensive health screening examination between 2011 and 2013 (median age 40 years). Sugar-sweetened carbonated beverage consumption was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire, and CAC was measured by cardiac computed tomography. Multivariable-adjusted CAC score ratios and 95% CIs were estimated from robust Tobit regression models for the natural logarithm (CAC score +1). Results The prevalence of detectable CAC (CAC score >0) was 11.7% (n = 2,604). After adjustment for age; sex; center; year of screening examination; education level; physical activity; smoking; alcohol intake; family history of cardiovascular disease; history of hypertension; history of hypercholesterolemia; and intake of total energy, fruits, vegetables, and red and processed meats, only the highest category of sugar-sweetened carbonated beverage consumption was associated with an increased CAC score compared with the lowest consumption category. The multivariable-adjusted CAC ratio comparing participants who consumed ≥5 sugar-sweetened carbonated beverages per week with nondrinkers was 1.70 (95% CI, 1.03-2.81). This association did not differ by clinical subgroup, including participants at low cardiovascular risk. Conclusion Our findings suggest that high levels of sugar-sweetened carbonated beverage consumption are associated with a higher prevalence and degree of CAC in asymptomatic adults without a history of cardiovascular disease, cancer, or diabetes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)17-24
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican heart journal
Volume177
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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    Chun, S., Choi, Y., Chang, Y., Cho, J., Zhang, Y., Rampal, S., Zhao, D., Ahn, J., Suh, B. S., Pastor-Barriuso, R., Lima, J. A. C., Chung, E. C., Shin, H., Guallar, E., & Ryu, S. (2016). Sugar-sweetened carbonated beverage consumption and coronary artery calcification in asymptomatic men and women. American heart journal, 177, 17-24. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ahj.2016.03.018