Suction lesions of the frontal cerebral cortex in the rat induce asymmetrical behavioral and catecholaminergic responses

Godfrey D. Pearlson, Robert G. Robinson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Suction lesions of the right frontal cerebral cortex in rats induce a period of spontaneous hyperactivity. This hyperactivity, as measured by an increase in running wheel activity begins about one week post-operatively and continues throughout the remainder of a 30-day observation period. The increased activity is accompanied by a bilateral decrease in norepinephrine concentrations in both the ipsilateral and contralateral cortex and locus coeruleus. Identical lesions of the left frontal cerebral cortex produce neither the hyperactivity nor a decrease in norepinephrine concentrations. These experiments have reproduced many of the behavioral and biochemical asymmetries seen after middle cerebral artery ligation; however, suction lesions are both simpler to produce and histologically less variable in their effects.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)233-242
    Number of pages10
    JournalBrain research
    Volume218
    Issue number1-2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Aug 10 1981

    Keywords

    • behavioral asymmetry
    • catecholamines
    • frontal cerebral cortex
    • suction lesions

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Neuroscience(all)
    • Molecular Biology
    • Clinical Neurology
    • Developmental Biology

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