Successful recruitment of healthy African American men to genomic studies from high-volume community health fairs: Implications for future genomic research in minority populations

Yash R. Patel, Katherine A. Carr, David Magjuka, Yousef Mohammadi, Edward F. Dropcho, Angela D. Reed, Marietta L. Moore, Mary Jane Waddell, Rivienne Shedd-Steele, Christopher J. Sweeney, Noah M. Hahn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Study of genomic data obtained from patient biospecimens is frequent in research of subjects with prostate and other epithelial malignancies. Understanding of the characteristics of healthy men who participate in genomic research is limited. Methods: Patients were identified through the Prostate Cancer Genetic Risk Evaluation of SNPs Study and the Indiana University Cancer Biomarker Study, 2 population-based biomarker and cohort studies. Between 2006 and 2010, healthy Caucasian (n = 774) and healthy African American (n = 381) men were recruited and enrolled at high-volume free community health fairs. Each participant completed a demographic questionnaire and provided a blood sample for genomic research investigations. Frequency differences between demographic features of healthy African American and Caucasian men were compared and analyzed by 2-sample t test and multivariate logistic regression after adjusting potential confounding variables with significance at the P <.05 level. Features examined included: age, body mass index (BMI), income, education, marital status, tobacco, alcohol, family history, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, and prior prostate cancer screening history. Results: Significant differences between healthy Caucasian and African American men participating in genomic research included: marital status (married, 69% Caucasian vs 46% African American, P< <.001), mean age (years, 58 Caucasian vs 54 African American, P <.001), mean BMI (kg/m 2, 30.9 Caucasian vs 32.3 African American, P =.004), annual income (P =.038), education (P =.002), and mean PSA (ng/mL, 1.2 Caucasian vs 2.0 African American, P =.005). Conclusions: Significant demographic differences exist between healthy Caucasian and African American men choosing to participate in genomic research. These differences may be important in designing genomic research study recruitment strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1075-1082
Number of pages8
JournalCancer
Volume118
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 15 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • African American
  • community health fairs
  • demographics
  • genomic research
  • healthy population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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