Successful implementation of helping babies survive and helping mothers survive programs-An utstein formula for newborn and maternal survival

Hege L. Ersdal, Nalini Singhal, Georgina Msemo, K. C. Ashish, Santorino Data, Nester T. Moyo, Cherrie L. Evans, Jeffrey Smith, Jeffrey M. Perlman, Susan Niermeyer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Globally, the burden of deaths and illness is still unacceptably high at the day of birth. Annually, approximately 300.000 women die related to childbirth, 2.7 million babies die within their first month of life, and 2.6 million babies are stillborn. Many of these fatalities could be avoided by basic, but prompt care, if birth attendants around the world had the necessary skills and competencies to manage life-Threatening complications around the time of birth. Thus, the innovative Helping Babies Survive (HBS) and Helping Mothers Survive (HMS) programs emerged to meet the need for more practical, low-cost, and low-Tech simulationbased training. This paper provides users of HBS and HMS programs a 10-point list of key implementation steps to create sustained impact, leading to increased survival of mothers and babies. The list evolved through an Utstein consensus process, involving a broad spectrum of international experts within the field, and can be used as a means to guide processes in low-resourced countries. Successful implementation of HBS and HMS training programs require country-led commitment, readiness, and follow-up to create local accountability and ownership. Each country has to identify its own gaps and define realistic service delivery standards and patient outcome goals depending on available financial resources for dissemination and sustainment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0178073
JournalPloS one
Volume12
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

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infants
neonates
Mothers
Parturition
Newborn Infant
Survival
Lead
Cost of Illness
Ownership
Social Responsibility
childbirth
Costs
Consensus
ownership
education programs
Education
Costs and Cost Analysis
death

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Successful implementation of helping babies survive and helping mothers survive programs-An utstein formula for newborn and maternal survival. / Ersdal, Hege L.; Singhal, Nalini; Msemo, Georgina; Ashish, K. C.; Data, Santorino; Moyo, Nester T.; Evans, Cherrie L.; Smith, Jeffrey; Perlman, Jeffrey M.; Niermeyer, Susan.

In: PloS one, Vol. 12, No. 6, e0178073, 01.06.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ersdal, HL, Singhal, N, Msemo, G, Ashish, KC, Data, S, Moyo, NT, Evans, CL, Smith, J, Perlman, JM & Niermeyer, S 2017, 'Successful implementation of helping babies survive and helping mothers survive programs-An utstein formula for newborn and maternal survival', PloS one, vol. 12, no. 6, e0178073. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0178073
Ersdal, Hege L. ; Singhal, Nalini ; Msemo, Georgina ; Ashish, K. C. ; Data, Santorino ; Moyo, Nester T. ; Evans, Cherrie L. ; Smith, Jeffrey ; Perlman, Jeffrey M. ; Niermeyer, Susan. / Successful implementation of helping babies survive and helping mothers survive programs-An utstein formula for newborn and maternal survival. In: PloS one. 2017 ; Vol. 12, No. 6.
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