Success rates of conventional versus endoscope-assisted probing for congenital nasolacrimal duct obstruction in children 12 years and younger

Alicia Galindo-Ferreiro, Patricia Akaishi, Augusto Cruz, Rajiv Khandekar, Saif Dossari, Mohammed Dufaileej, Alberto Galvez-Ruiz, Silvana Schellini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To compare the success rates for congenital nasolacrimal duct obstruction (CNLDO) treated with conventional probing versus endoscope-assisted probing. Methods: A retrospective nonrandomized comparison of the success rates in children (0 to 12 years) with CNLDO who underwent conventional probing or endoscope-assisted probing. Success was defined as absence of tearing or negative fluorescein dye disappearance test. Stent was evaluated. Results: A total of 270 patients with CNLDO comprised the study population. The mean age was 37 months in the conventional probing group and 48.5 months in the endoscope-assisted probing group. The subjective and objective success rates were 76.1% and 75.9%, respectively, in the conventional probing group and 95.7% and 95.7%, respectively, in the endoscope-assisted probing group. The success rates were higher for both methods in the endoscope-assisted probing group (P < .005). The success rate decreased in older children in the conventional probing group (100% < 6 months; 62.5% > 48 months) and remained stable in the endoscope-assisted probing group (100% < 6 months; 97% > 48 months). Stent did not improve success. Conclusions: Endoscope-assisted probing increased success in older children and children with bilateral obstruction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)292-299
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus
Volume53
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Medicine(all)
  • Ophthalmology

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