Success and succession

Irwin H. Marill, Everett R. Siegel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The etymology of the word success and its relationship to succession is elucidated. Linkage is made to the consequences of unconscious "legitimate" and "illicit" fulfillments in life. This is explored in the writings of Freud and others. Emphasis is placed on guilt, a major factor blocking the attainment of success. This guilt derives from unconscious parricide, which permeates and contaminates themes of succession. How early objects, particularly oedipal ones, are "killed off" in the process of gaining autonomy and achievement without literally invoking unconscious murder is explored. The retaliatory aspects of failure are also addressed. Illustrations employing case material are used to highlight these theoretical constructs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)673-688
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of the American Psychoanalytic Association
Volume52
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jun 2004

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Guilt
Homicide
Terminology
Unconscious (Psychology)
blocking factor
Linkage
Etymology
Sigmund Freud
Parricide
Autonomy
Fulfillment
Murder

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Marill, I. H., & Siegel, E. R. (2004). Success and succession. Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 52(3), 673-688.

Success and succession. / Marill, Irwin H.; Siegel, Everett R.

In: Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, Vol. 52, No. 3, 06.2004, p. 673-688.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Marill, IH & Siegel, ER 2004, 'Success and succession', Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, vol. 52, no. 3, pp. 673-688.
Marill IH, Siegel ER. Success and succession. Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association. 2004 Jun;52(3):673-688.
Marill, Irwin H. ; Siegel, Everett R. / Success and succession. In: Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association. 2004 ; Vol. 52, No. 3. pp. 673-688.
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